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EXHIBITIONS ARCHIVE

2017

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Marabouparken launch a new series of research residencies this Spring in which a number of collectives, archives and organisations are offered space in the top-level gallery to develop their work and publicly present new strands of research.

To launch this new series we will collaborate with Filmform – the Art Film and Video Archive, based in Stockholm. For 3 months we will work together to build a specific collection of films made by and about women. During this time it will be possible to access and investigate parts of Filmform’s collection and learn more about the organisation’s history and evolvement. The residency offers a moment of reflection for Filmform who are currently undergoing shifts in how they deal with archiving their collection and ways to present it to the public in a new website. This moment of transformation allows questions to be asked about how an archive evolves? Particularly when film equipment, materials and processes have drastically changed? How do we categorise or collect films that deal with women’s experience and feminism with an intersectional perspective? And when categories of gender have been radically eroded? A series of public screenings with artists and other film archives will open up a discussion that seeks to inform these questions and Filmform’s ongoing development.

Click to see all upcoming film screenings

Filmform was established in 1950 and is the only organisation of its kind in Sweden. It is dedicated to the preservation, promotion and Worldwide distribution of Swedish experimental film and video art. As well as a distribution agency Filmform often en-gages as an advisor to museums, galleries, universities and festivals. The collection still acquires work each year and spans from the 1920s to today largely focused on works by Swedish artists but also includes a selection of works from all Nordic countries.

Pioneering Women Press Photographers

Alma Haag, Ellen Dahlberg and Ragnhild Haarstad
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During the 20th century in Sweden, a few women at various newspapers defied the social mores and proved that it was possible to occupy a prominent position in the profession. With extreme presence and sensitivity, their images captured some of the crucial moments, people and events of the age and they were widely disseminated in newspapers. Pioneering Women Press Photographers presents three of these photographers: Alma Haag, Ellen Dahlberg and Ragnhild Haarstad. Together they span almost a hundred years of press photography.

Alma Haag

alma_scan_2016_014
Alma Haag

Ellen Dahlberg

Ellen Dahlberg
Ellen Dahlberg
Ellen Dahlberg

Ragnhild Haarstad

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Revolution Poetry presents Revolution Art

Revolution Poetry is a Stockholm based cultural/art movement and spoken word platform. Since the end of 2009 they have been creating a new stage for Spoken Word, that gives space to voices of people of colour (POC) which often shares and draws inspiration from experiences of living in Stockholm’s suburbs.  Over the past 7 years they have filled small rooms, culture houses and toured Sweden, building an important movement for artists and activists who use their voice to contribute to the picture of what Swedish life is like today; and what dreams we have to change society for the better.

Their work is built on a fundamental belief in justice, in giving public space to individuals who don’t feel they have space in everyday society. After the spread and success of their work Revolution Poetry are ready to embark on a new phase of working at Marabouparken. During their research residency here they will develop a new strand of working called Revolution Art. Revolution Art offers a new avenue for artists and performers to develop cross disciplinary work that does not need to be fixed to a live event.

Over the 3 months Revolution Poetry will used their residency space at Marabouparken as a studio to share their work, hold meetings with artists, and host public events and workshops. In the residency space you can also spend time and find documentation from previous performances and browse a library of books related to post colonial politics. During their residency you are welcome to come and use their working space at Marabouparken. On a number of Wednesday evenings a member of Revolution Art will be in the space to meet you and discuss your work. Please visit Facebook to check which dates Revolution Art will be there.

Nachla Vargas Alaeb is an artist and poet. She is one of the founders of the movement, scene and platform Revolution Poetry where she is the artistic leader. Nachla has produced and directed Spoken Word shows including with Unga Klara, Dramaten, Orionteatern, Folkteatern Göteborg, Stadsteatern Malmö. She works as a Spoken Word pedagogue and arranges workshops in Spoken Word together with Revolution Poetry around Sweden. She has as Bachelor in International Relations, a Masters in Human Rights and is now studying visual art at Konstfack.

Alejandro Montero Bravo has a bachelor degree in fine arts at Konstfack and is currently studying for his Masters at Konstfack. Alejandro makes bold expressions and installations which are engaged in an artistic-political strategy of questioning supremacy, redefining western norms of aesthetics and claiming space through re-appropriating one’s culture. He is currently working on a commission for one of the new floors at Södersjukhuset in Stockholm. www.alejandromonterobravo.com 

Maryam Dinar is a photographer and art enthusiast and is currently currently studying social work at Stockholm University. Maryam performed in the play Svenska Hijabis.

This is the second in Marabouparken’s new research residencies which offers space and resources for collectives and groups to develop new strands of their practice. The residency is part of the ongoing research project ‘Acts of Self Ruin’ which questions how to build solidarity and equality in an age of individualism. Their residency also ties to the current exhibition ‘Starting from the Self’, where personal experiences are used to question the society that structures and divides us.

Workshop – Justice Through Art

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Sound is a vibration. Sound is something intangible. For sound to come there has to be a movement a force. Sound moves in waves, sound-waves. Sound can cross walls, ceilings, seas and territories. Sound can cross borders; it is border-crossing. But, there are some walls that are made of strong, sound-proof material that sound cannot pass through, for example prison walls.The voice is a sound coming from a body. Radio is a form of communication carried through sound. We make radio. Through radio we can collaborate on making border-crossing soundsThe Bridge Radio

Welcome to Bridge Radio’s research residency at Marabouparken – a programme strand in which we collaborate with projects and collectives to support their work and develop new strands of practice. During the Autumn Bridge Radio will be working on radio production workshops and a series of broadcasts from Stockholm.

The Bridge Radio is an independent radio project created by people with and without citizenship, who produce radio about migration, asylum and people’s movements. The radio strives to support self-organisation among people who live without citizenship and to create a wide group of reporters. While staying critical towards the dominant discourse on asylum and migration the Bridge Radio aims to share information around the current developments related to asylum and migration, striving to spread the stories of those who have experienced migration and their struggle for the freedom of movement.

The Bridge Radio started in 2015 as a protest against the repressive migration regime in EU. Today, border and migration issues are visible in the public debate, but it is rarely presented from the perspective of those taking the journey or experiencing the asylum system themselves. The Bridge Radio find it essential to never stay silent about what is happening on the EUs’ borders and in places of detention. It is only by raising our voices, that change can happen.

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Listen to The Bridge Radio’s LIVE Programme broadcast from Marabouparken (October 15, 2017), tune in and catch up to their important discussion on Deportation Resistance with interviews from Ung I Sverige and Copenhagen activists.

SARAH BROWNE
Report to an Academy

Opening 8 March
Exhibition 9 March–23 April 2017

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The key work in the exhibition is a film essay also titled Report to an Academy that explores an art school as a Kafkaesque, neoliberal workplace, where language is a tool of conflict. Report to an Academy is a reworking of the Kafka story of the same title. In the original story, an ape delivers an address to a gathering on his transition into human life. Within Report to an Academy the protagonist is an octopus who tells us of her motivation to escape her human form and transform herself into an octopus in the search for new forms of expression and physical agility.

Report to an Academy builds on Browne’s and her colleagues’ experience of working within a university. A series of workshops with staff and students at the Royal Institute of Art and the University College of Arts, Crafts and Design explore different ways of responding to institutional language through activities such as constructing poetry from graffiti within the art school, and materialising spaces of non-complaint through basic mouth-casting techniques. Versions of the workshop are also happening in Glasgow School of Art & University College Dublin. The workshop and film hope to articulate, share and re-imagine bodily experiences of work within institutions of knowledge production. Elements from the workshops can be found within the exhibition guide.

This is Sarah Browne’s first solo exhibition in Sweden and begins a new series of solo exhibitions within Marabouparken’s BOX gallery.  Report to an Academy is the second exhibition within Acts of Self Ruin, Marabouparken Konsthall’s long term exhibition programme dedicated to exploring the struggle for collectivity and equality in an age of individualism. With this presentation Browne explores the alienation of the workplace and the physical stresses exerted on workers’ bodies. The workshops in particular offer a way to discuss, share and connect our experiences of work. Report to an Academy was originally commissioned by Manual Labours, a research project focused on the ‘complaining body’ in the contemporary workplace in 2016.

Sarah Browne is an artist based in Ireland. She is particularly concerned with how socially-engaged art projects can develop methodologies that are not solely discursive, in order to address non-verbal, bodily experiences of knowledge and justice. This primarily sculptural practice also includes writing, publishing, performance and public projects. The artist often engages in extensive collaborative methods in the production of her work.

Recent solo exhibitions include Hand to Mouth at CCA Derry~Londonderry & Institute of Modern Art, Brisbane, and The Invisible Limb, basis, Frankfurt (both 2014). In 2016 with Jesse Jones she developed In the Shadow of the State, a collaborative co-commission by Artangel and Create (Ireland). This work involved close collaboration with women in the fields of law, music, material culture and midwifery, and addressed the regulation of the female body by the nation state through a series of legal workshops and performances in Derry, Liverpool, Dublin and London. In 2009 Browne co-represented Ireland at the 53rd Venice Biennale with Gareth Kennedy as Kennedy Browne – the name for their collaborative practice. Browne lectures in the Department of Sculpture and Expanded Practice at the National College of Art and Design, Dublin and is currently artist-in-residence at the UCD School of Law and Social Science, Dublin.
(Headphones on the picture above created by Ciara O’Kelly, Proposal for a Mobile Studio, 2015. Safety earmuffs, conch shell, elastic band.)

www.sarahbrowne.info

In spring 2017, Marabouparken Art Gallery will collaborate with Livstycket in Tensta. Together we will explore the perception of women’s work throughout history until today.
The project includes: an exhibition (5/6–28/5), a collaboration (workshops during February, March, and April), and an event (a fashion show 5/20).

COLLABORATION PROJECT
Livstycket at Marabouparken Konsthall

In spring 2017, Marabouparken Art Gallery will collaborate with Livstycket in Tensta. Together we will explore the perception of women’s work throughout history until today. The project is part of an ongoing, larger project at Marabouparken entitled Acts of Self Ruin, which explores the struggle for collectivity and equality in an age of individualism. Through a range of activities including exhibitions, residencies and a public programme, we direct attention to groups and individuals who are pursuing equality, solidarity and alternative ways of living.

Livstycket is a modern knowledge and design centre in Tensta, involving women from all over the world. The purpose of Livstycket is to provide women who have immigrated to Sweden with an opportunity to learn the Swedish language and culture, while enhancing their self-esteem and providing them with possibilities to integrate into Swedish society.

Photo: Anna Tersmeden

Early on in its history, Marabou recruited outside labour. From the 1940s and onwards, mainly women were recruited, many from the Swedish countryside and neighbouring Finland. By learning about the history of the Marabou factory and women’s working conditions during this time, the women from Livstycket can draw parallels to their own lives and work experiences. How was women’s work, in factories and at home, valued then – and how is it valued now? The project aims to raise issues about work, profession and identity from a female historical and cultural perspective.

Livstycket applies functional pedagogy, which combines artistic activities with theoretical teaching. Sewing, embroidery and textile printing, paired with Swedish language lessons and social studies, are the basis for the activities.The project encompasses meetings, guided tours, field trips, workshops and lectures broadly based on the theme of Women and Work. Inspired by the project’s theme and context, participants from Livstycket, in collaboration with the staff, will design new textile patterns. The Livstycket participants will contribute with their life stories, experiences and creativity, which, in the encounter with Marabou Park, with its industrial and cultural history, may lead to innovation and self-development.

Textiles, documentation of the working process, design sketches and a new clothing line will form part of a larger presentation of Livstycket, which will be displayed at Marabouparken in May. A fashion show will be held in connection with the exhibition and Livstycket’s annual Spring Fair will take place in the park.

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Robel Temesgen will present his first solo exhibition in Sweden. Working in painting, installation and hand written newspapers and publications the exhibition presents work that mobilises different strategies to address the social, political and economic context in Ethiopia. Concerned in the construction of public space and the connection between gathering places of spiritual or cultural tradition and their potential as gathering places of political collectivity, Temesgen produces a series of new paintings reflecting on these significant yet overlooked locations. Whilst the painting might be perceived by the viewer as a pleasing composition of colour and form Robel feeds this seemingly uninhibiting medium with hidden meaning.

A series of hand written newspapers gather different stories and accounts from Ethiopian media forming a collage of voices and happenings. Ambivalent in their narrative the fragmented collection is painstakingly hand written onto each sheet. This old news provokes comment on the content our newspapers usually hold and what value can be placed there? Another series of small handmade publications mimic what one might find ina sacred spiritual amulet. Their tiny pages are printed with images of locations Robel has investigated in the paintings. Captured here for intimate reflection the images test whether their political potential can be captured on film or in print. At the back of the exhibition stairs invite the audience to sit down and read a paper left there. In Addis Ababa often newspapers are not for sale but are rented by the reader as they catch up on news or search for jobs and advertisements. Here too these newspapers are not tobe taken away but offer a moment for you to browse, sit a while and review what kind of gathering place has been created here?

Robel Temesgen (b. 1987, Ethiopia) received MFA in Contemporary Art from Tromsø Academy of Contemporary Art and Creative Writing, University of Tromsø, Norway in 2015 and a BFA in Painting from ASFAD, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia in 2010. His practice focuses on painting and encompasses elements of performance, installation, video and collaborative projects. Since 2010, Temesgen is a Lecturer at the Department of Painting, Alle School of Fine Arts and Design, Addis Ababa University. His work has been exhibited in Ethiopia and internationally.

Fikret Atay, Paulo Bruscky, Tove Dreiman, Lucy Parker, belit sağ, Ritu Sarin & Tenzing Sonam, Arvid Sveen

In the Reading Room: Index on Censorship, Practice Based Klinik Against Censorship with Johanna Gustavsson, Felice Hapetzeder, belit sağ, Seçil Yaylalı and more.

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Ritu Sarin och Tenzing Sonam, Drapchi Elegy, 2017. Foto: Jean-Baptiste Béranger
Fikret Atay, Rebels of the Dance, 2002
Lucy Parker, Apologies, 2016. Foto: Jean-Baptiste Béranger

Lucy Parker, installation view. Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam, Drapchi Elegy, video 2017. Fikret Atay, Rebels of the Dance, video 2002. Lucy Parker Apologies, video 2016

Mouth Shut, Loud Shouts deals with questions of censorship and silencing deeply rooted in colonial regimes. The suppression of speech, information, language and image is expansive and operates in different ways across the globe. Works within the exhibition present how censoring can operate as a mode of marginalisation and delegitimisation. Whilst some work directly opposes forms of state censorship, other works deal with pervasive embodied codes of self censorship. Importantly the work looks to practices that transgress these modes of silencing and suppression, finding spaces, avenues and aesthetic forms that leak out voices to the world and ourselves.

People are not often told when visiting a culture space what violences you might be confronted with and what situations you might encounter there. Mouth Shut, Loud Shouts holds many disturbing stories and might indeed affect you in ways we do not know. Yet we hope that these stories, these voices communicated through narrative, film and drawings, form new languages to the world. Multiple languages that erode and attack the silencing their communities are subject to, helping us build solidarity across geographies, experience and time.

Paulo Bruscky, installation view

When you enter, Marabouparken’s exhibition space is largely concealed to the viewer by a new work by Tove Drieman – a large curtain which explores ideas of self censorship based upon Drieman’s personal experience of growing up in Sweden. The usual bird’s eye view of the space is ruptured and becomes a border dividing the space. If you were to seek beyond this screen you will find an installation by Paulo Bruscky that presents elements of a huge body of work created during the military dictatorship in Brazil 1964 to 1985 and his efforts to break out of the confines of political isolation through a network of letter correspondence. The prevention of communication can be felt in the work of Fikret Atay whose video Rebels of the Dance depicts two young boys singing illegalised Kurdish festive dance songs. belit sağ also explores forms of censorship of Kurdish histories in her video Ayhan and Me in which first hand experiences of censoring of her own work become entwined in the narrative of the original film that was censored. Alongside this work are a series of documents produced by the organisation Siyah Bant (Black Band) which shows in more detail the process of belit sağ’s censorship case and exposes the process of Siyah Bant to platform and speak out against censorship of artistic expression.

The consequences of speaking out against oppressive regimes are investigated in the compelling film Drapchi Elegy by Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam. The Tibetan woman Namdol Lhamo discusses her story in which a non-violent protest against Chinese rule led to years of imprisonment and a life of political exile. Returning back to forms of censorship much closer to home is a work by Lucy Parker whose long term research into the Blacklisting of workers in the UK construction industry reveals an ongoing struggle against state and corporation censorship and silencing. Posters by Arvid Sveen draw discussions to the Nordic region and the continued oppression of Sami people, the possession of their land and the violent redressing of their culture. This ongoing struggle focuses on the brutal destruction of Sweden’s environment, the pollution of rivers and the industrialisation of land, which has removed the resources their livelihoods rely on.

Posters by Arvid Sveen

Moving back towards Tove Drieman’s curtain from this other side of the exhibition space, new forms come into view, shapes that hope to articulate the more pervasive methods of silencing that we embody within ourselves: the words we are trained not to say or the struggles we don’t stand in solidarity with. Contextualising these complex and challenging works is a sensitive and serious task and further reading in our reading room – where we hope you can spend time – explores how we might address and fight against the multiple forms of silencing both from the perspective of the state as well as from within ourselves.

belit sağ, Ayhan and Me, 2016

Lilian Domec, Hackney Flashers, Helga Henschen, Lubaina Himid, Pia Sandström och Billie Zangewa
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Starting from the Self is a group exhibition exploring practices that begin from the personal experiences of the artist(s) to understand how society is structured and organises us. The exhibition is particularly concerned with how gender, race and class play into questions of private and public boundaries and the different ways people have transgressed and renegotiated these  borders and the categorisation of space.

The exhibition includes work by local artist Helga Henschen, a resident of Sundbyberg who persistently and playfully inserted her words and work into the public sphere. Henschen is known for reformulating advertising space to publicly communicate her criticisms of society, and for building an art practice that could be tied to public political work through the Social Democrat Party, where she fought for the rights of political prisoners and children. Stockholm based artist Pia Sandström develops a new commission in the gallery, that explores the urban environment as seen through the eyes and experiences of the other female artists in the exhibition. Pia’s work forms a framework to navigate the works of Helga Henschen, Lilian Domec, Hackney Flashers, Lubaina Himid, and Billie Zangewa.

Notions of public and private space and the codes with which we behave in these spheres becomes sometimes painfully evident when entering an art space. Unwritten rules such as quietness, no running, or even where you are allowed to enter the gallery can produce anxiety. At Marabouparken Konsthall, Pia Sandström tries to play with, and breakdown those regulations. Another entrance way stands ajar, offering a backdoor for the audience to find their way into the space whilst a series of pillars replicating the original architecture, reshape the main gallery. With these pillars Pia provides a support structure for displaying Helga Henschen’s posters, simulating the cultural advertisements you would see outside the gallery strapped around lampposts. Other painted arrows and floor markings suggest connection and navigation for the audience between the other works.

For example, Henschen and Domec’s work and life shares many similarities. Both were active in the same period and used their work to stimulate political discussion and debate through drawing and commentary in the public sphere. They both were part of the women’s movement and spurred on the implementation of gender equality reforms in the 1970s. Women’s rights are discussed in the slideshow by Hackney Flashers, whose campaign around childcare and the isolation of women at home was happening simultaneously in the UK. Questions around how we might understand motherhood and female identity today can also be found in the work of Billie Zangewa and her depiction of the contemporary parent, single and empowered in her home.

But what happens when we move from the home into the public space? What controls and boundaries are in place there? Lubaina Himid’s piece What are monuments for: Paris / London Guidebooks considers what we see when we encounter a city – what people and names can be seen on city streets or historicised in monuments? And what invisible regulations do these entrench in the narrative of who makes a city and who a city is for? Her piece Jelly Mould Pavillions offers us an alternative sculptural walk through the Konsthall. There you can see a proposal for other monuments for the city of Liverpool, that we might see if it were indeed a place that recognised and represented the contribution of it’s communities to the place it is today.

Posters by Helga Henschen. Installation view with Lubaina Himid. Photo: Jean-Baptiste Béranger

Each of these distinct works raise discussions on separation and boundaries based on gender, race and class, which feel ever more relevant to raise today. These critiques have developed from a willingness of the contributors to start from the self, to build upon personal experiences and histories in order to understand how society segregates us. Yet these works also offer hope, proposals, a way forward in order to provoke debate, change and transgress these preset divides. The city can be seen as a place where these invisible boundaries are intensified yet they are also sites of continuous change and activity, activity that disregards these unwritten rules, and persistently erodes the invisible codes of conduct. As Lilian Domec once wrote in a postcard to her friend and collaborator, art must demonstrate, that everything is possible if you let go of habitual thought patterns.

In connection to the exhibition we open up the Konsthall and present Spring Clean – a weekend of events and performances investigating the different ways society structures us to perform in different spaces, from public to private, from home to work. For more information and to find out about our full public programme please visit www.marabouparken.se

Starting from the Self is the third exhibition within Acts of Self Ruin and connects to practices which challenge and question the normalised boundaries between self and society, the personal and political. Practices that can be described as putting themselves risk or ruin in questioning the control (and choreography) of different bodies and actions within public space.

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Lubaina Himid, Jelly Moulds, 2017

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New Enter Image

Miriam Bäckström’s exhibition New Enter Image, is a new body of work that negotiates the boundaries of photography, textile and architecture. The focus of the exhibition is a large-scale installation of suspended woven tapestries based upon photographs Miriam Bäckström has taken. Created in different sizes and formats, these tapestries redefine the architecture in the gallery. The original photographs are extremely high-resolution digital images of various banal manufactured surfaces including textile, plastic and cardboard. They capture the intricate details that only advanced technology is able to register. This information is then translated into digitally woven tapestries, a medium often associated as traditional and tangible: where the resolution of the photographic image ends, the yarns of the textile begin.

In Miriam Bäckström’s previous work, photographs of rooms and interiors reveal themselves to be staged or referred to reality to somehow be artificial. In Set Constructions (1996–2002) the works offer two perspectives of a film set within one image. One perspective documents the world that Bäckström is in when documenting the film set, whilst the other presents the illusion, the film set, which is a reality in it self. In these works fiction and reality are equally relevant and credible, yet visually distinguishable from each other. New Enter Image, builds on this work, where fiction and reality merge into one image, one perception.

Photography has, since its invention in the 1840s, placed the viewer in front of an image, to occupy the spot where the camera was positioned when the image was taken. Today, the mass and constant flow of images means there are multiple perspectives at play at anyone time. We can say that one no longer looks at an image from a singular perspective; but rather inhabits a situation from multiple viewpoints, or as Miriam Bäckström describes it, we are able to enter the image.

Artificial reality is characterised by the absence of rules and restrictions that determine its physical counterpart. Today, it could be said that photography is being forced to abandon the tasks it traditionally was born to perform – as a tool to represent and document reality. Photography no longer signals ‘truthful representation of the real’. Instead it refers to itself, imitates itself and often references its own history.

In New Enter Image Miriam Bäckström pushes photographic perception to a point where distinctions between medium and image, material and surface become so paradoxical that they can no longer be upheld. She seeks to push the medium to a point of collapse. As a photographic method she employs imitation and illusion, recognition and distortion. Whilst the works in New Enter Image appear to be two-dimensional objective representations of matter; they can in fact be said to render every depicted surface unidentifiable and offer the viewer hypothetical, theoretical and highly speculative scenes.

The exhibition New Enter Image also presents the film Som man brukar säga (As The Saying Goes), a staged play, that has been filmed in front of an audience. The work can be read as a competition in acting or as the art of making conversation. Every character in the play is distinguished by a particular character description. Six actors are given a character, without knowing which one they will play in advance. There is no opportunity for a read through of the script or a rehearsal. According to the rules of the game all interpretations of their characters are permitted: the actors are able to choose during the course of the game, what lines and directions they want to use to portray the character they believe themselves to be.

Reoccurring exclamations of speech and actions are the foundation upon which the characters are built. As the play develops these actions begin to expose their character’s possibilities and limitations. The audience is able to follow the desire of the characters, desires we often attempt to hide or conceal. In the re-occurring pattern of performance, it is possible for the audience to follow, not only the character that is in construction, but also chart the characters fate.

Miriam Bäckström’s significant practice works across photography, video, script writing, performance and installation. Her work employs the term ’character’ – meaning the roles that we play and that play us, as well as the qualities we perceive in people and things – as a tool for disassembling and reassembling image, language and behavior. Miriam Bäckström seeks to create new behaviours and a new understanding of language and images never seen before.

2016

Seeing Through

This fall Marabouparken art centre will be presenting two solo shows with artists Anna Nordquist Andersson and David Claerbout, who in different ways use images as tools for seeing. Through their images we can revisit history, memory and even stay lingering in a fleeting moment. Both artists manipulate their material and create complex images that give the spectators a chance to contemplate a piece of time from new perspectives.

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In her exhibition Genomsyn / Seeing Through, Malmö-based artist Anna Nordquist Andersson presents different but closely related groups of works that are linked by a wide-ranging interest in the power of the gaze. A central concern of these works is the gaze and the manner in which we can use images as a tool to see. But whose gaze is seeing and what is seen by the gaze? In a feminist and surrealist tradition, Anna Nordquist Andersson creates playful and critical collages by making incisions in the media images that have shaped our perception of reality since the early 1960s. In the group of works entitled I See Through You (2008–2012), Anna Nordquist Andersson uses a scalpel to cut through layers of magazine pages, revealing eyes that gaze out from a spread in which they were never intended to be seen. The transformation that occurs when these primarily female eyes are dislocated from their original context, in one of the magazine’s advertisements, and placed in their new location, on the magazine’s cover or in a feature article, is quite simply dizzying. Seductive and graceful gazes suddenly become threatening, sad, melancholy or humorous.

Anna Nordquist Andersson was born in 1976 in Malmö. She has participated in numerous exhibitions at galleries and art institutions both in Sweden and abroad, including: Galleri Ping-Pong, Malmö (Black Chamber, 2014); Trondheim Kunstmuseum (Lips Painted Red, 2013); Turku Art Museum, Finland (DEJA VU 2012); Peter Lav Gallery, Copenhagen (I See Through You, 2012); Malmö Art Museum (The Real Thing, 2008); Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA (Facades, 2007) and Kunsthal Charlottenburg, Copenhagen (From Dust to Dusk, 2003). In spring 2015 Anna Nordquist Andersson was artist-in-residence at the Nirox Foundation in Johannesburg.

Anna Nordquist Andersson, I See Through You (Women Emancipation), collage 2008-2012
Anna Nordquist Andersson, I See Through You (The Guru), collage 2008-2012

This fall Marabouparken art centre will be presenting two solo shows with artists Anna Nordquist Andersson and David Claerbout, who in different ways use images as tools for seeing. Through their images we can revisit history, memory and even stay lingering in a fleeting moment. Both artists manipulate their material and create complex images that give the spectators a chance to contemplate a piece of time from new perspectives.

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The Belgian artist David Claerbout’s work sits at the crossroads between photography and film, encouraging crosspollination where photographs are given movement and film is brought almost to a halt. Close-ups of faces and architectural details to the seaside vista echo the panoramic sense of time that he seeks to articulate. His works mainly deals with a single situation, a single image, sometime presented from a myriad of positions. As in The Algiers’ Sections of a Happy Moment, set in a small soccer field on a roof of the Kasbah of Algiers where young Maghrebians pause their soccer game as one of the players feeds a group of seagulls. To get a sense of the multiplicity of this single moment and the varied ways that it might be committed to memory, more than 50 000 photographs were captured and finally 600 projected photos were carefully composed to create this continuous moment in time. The succession of images of this “happy” moment reflects an aim to open up what the artist terms as “the suspicious gaze” turned against a particular group of people. The exhibition is the first major presentation of David Claerbout’s work in Sweden.

David Claerbout har ställt ut internationellt och haft separatutställningar på bland andra Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam (2014), Kunsthalle Mainz (2013); Secession, Wien (2012); Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv (2012); Parasol Unit, London (2012); Wiels, Bryssel (2011); SFMoMA, San Francisco (2011); Pinakothek der Moderne, München (2010); DE PONT, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tilburg (2009), och Centre Pompidou, Paris (2007). Hans arbeten har också visats i internationella grupputställningar som Sydneybiennalen (2013); Sharjahbiennalen (2013); Moskvabiennalen för samtidskonst (2013), och São Paulo-biennalen (2010).

David Claerbout, The Algiers Sections of A Happy Moment, video 2008

David Claerbout, The Quiet Shore, video 2011

Parallel Lines

Gittan Jönsson’s artistic career spans more than six decades. With the recurring themes of power structures and social relations her work is as wilful and strong as it is topical. She is an artist who affects us all; an artist who dares to be political and personal, an artist who gives the big events equal billing with the small. Nothing is too simple to be of importance. The first major retrospective presentation of Gittan Jönsson’s work, the exhibition culminates in the new film Parallella Linjer [Parallel Lines], in which the artist searches for traces of the feminist movement in Stockholm and Berlin, asking her self what became of all the rebellious efforts and actions?

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Gittan Jönsson (b. 1948) studied at the University College of Arts, Craft and Design in Stockholm during 1967–1972 and had her first solo exhibition in 1978 at Galleri Händer in Stockholm and Malmö. Her work has been shown in many places in Sweden such as Galleri Leger in Malmö, Bohusläns konsthall, The Royal Art Academy of Fine Arts and Liljevalchs konsthall in Stockholm, Skövde konsthall, Ystad Museum of Art, Gothenburg Museum of Art, Dunkers Kulturhus. Gittan Jönsson has made several commissioned works and authored publications as Historieboken (The History Book, 1970), Prinsessor utan Panik (Princesses without Panic, 2009) along with Kristina Abelli Elander and Dammsugerskans fyrtiotvå uppdrag (The 42 Missions of the Hooverer, 2011). Jönsson is represented in The Modern Museum of Art and The National Museum in Stockholm, Gothenburg Museum of Art, The Museum of Work in Norrköping, Borås konstmuseum, The Public Art Agency Sweden with more. Gittan Jönsson lives and works in Berlin and in Brantevik, Sweden.

“Do you still think it’s right to rebel?”
“Today, I think it’s more important to clean up.”

The Unstraight Museum is having a small exhibition in the parkpavilion in Marabouparken this summer. Part of The Unstraight Museum collection is on display and there will be a joint program of guided tours and other events connected to the exhibition.

The Unstraight Museum is a non-profit organisation working to draw attention to LGBTQI related questions within the museum and exhibition context. The purpose is to make non-normative and unstraight stories and history visible through cultural projects. Individuals who are ”invisible” or ”do not” exist, cannot demand any rights and will never be seen if their lives and stories are not represented. That is why representation is a key.

This is the first time the collection is put on a regular display, where it normally is only shown at The Unstraight Museums website. The collection that exists of mostly ordinary everyday objects is connected with a personal story that gives us another perspective of the meaning or representation of this objects.

Guided tours in Swedish will be available 18th of June, 16th of July and 20th of August, all at 2 pm. No charge.

For further information visit:

www.unstraight.org

When the stork landed in Sundbyberg

This year Sweden’s largest chocolate manufacturer, Marabou, celebrates its 100th anniversary. Beginning in 1916 as a family business in the small market town of Sundbyberg, Marabou has grown into one of Sweden’s best-known brands. In addition to chocolate, Marabou has bequeathed a cultural-historical heritage comprising a progressive workplace designed by leading designers and architects in the shadow of the tall factory tower. The exhibition When the stork landed in Sundbyberg depicts the first six decades of the history of Marabou.

marabou-forsaljare
marabou-arbetare

Early on and with an eye to the future, Marabou gave personnel welfare a central role in its corporate culture and quickly distinguished itself as one of the most modern industries of the era. Taking its Norwegian parent company A/S Freia as a model, Marabou was inspired by the idea that nature, architecture and art could serve as a counterweight to the negative effects of urbanisation and industrialisation. In keeping with the new values of the time, a progressive workplace was created in which social responsibility, art and an aesthetically designed environment were of great significance.

Hundred years have passed since the Marabou stork landed in Sundbyberg, and the stork has since flown away; the logo, featuring the eponymous bird, was revamped in the 1960s and in 1976 Marabou moved to Upplands Väsby. What remains is a small part of the sculpture collection, on view at the Marabou Park, and the stories of the people who worked in the factory, which in its heyday had almost 1,000 employees, many of whom were women, immigrants from neighbouring Finland and from rural areas in Sweden. They tell tales of an often exhausting, dangerous and monotonous work with a high turnover of staff. There are also accounts of a great community feeling and loyalty to both the company and to each other, of summer camps and staff parties. An exposé of Marabou’s history, the exhibition When the stork landed in Sundbyberg portrays the people behind the brand who worked at the factory, those who designed the facilities and their visions and the emergence of the confectionery industry in Swedish society.

Children’s Chocolate Workshop

In connection with the exhibition, there will be a clay workshop led by educator Johanna Norrbin, where children will have the opportunity to participate in an assembly line-type of production of ever lasting chocolates in various sizes and shapes. The workshop will be open Wednesdays and Sundays between the hours of 13-16 throughout August.

Margareta Hallek is on view until December 18, 2016.
Participating artists: Maria Adlercreutz, Elsa Agélii, Zandra Ahl, Olle Baertling, Helene Billgren, Ann Böttcher, “Moki” Cherry, Shabnam Faraee, Johanna Friedman, Josefin Gäfvert, Margareta Hallek, Leif Holmstrand, Charlotte Johannesson, Anna Nordström, Paola Torres Núñez del Prado, Veronica Nygren, Kaisa Melanton, Claes Oldenburg, Lennart Rodhe, Hannah Ryggen, Pia Sandström, Rickard Sollman, Elin Strand & the New Beauty Council, Bella Rune, Jennie Sundén & Åsa Norberg.
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The exhibition Textile Subtexts is part of a research project that takes an interest in divergent meanings of the textile, material culture and how it manifests itself in a work of art or in an artist’s practice. The project is curated by and a collaboration between Bella Rune, artist and Professor of Textiles at Konstfack, the University College of Arts, Craft and Design, Stockholm and Helena Selder, curator at Marabouparken Art Gallery.

Textile Subtexts takes its starting point in the “liberation” of textiles in the 1960s in Sweden. From here the investigation moves back and forward in time to pose questions on the role played by textiles in artistic practices and times. The moment of “liberation” is represented by, among others, Margareta Hallek, whose work is presented in a separate gallery, where we can follow the artist’s playful and experimental practice from the 1960s to the 1990s.

The exhibition brings together Swedish artists from several generations, including Hannah Ryggen (b. 1894) to Josefin Gäfvert (b. 1988), whose works activate various layers of the “textile subtext”. Some of these subtexts are visualised in the exhibition’s thematic “balls of yarn”, which are unravelled to create associations between artistic practices and works, presented in an exhibition architecture comprising walls constructed of safety and sports nets, dividing the space, exposing the reverse of the works, separating and connecting them.

Of particular relevance is “the history of women’s art ball of yarn”. It was largely female practitioners who, despite limited room for manoeuvre, not only renewed textile art in the 20th century, but also politicised and introduced textiles as an artistic material. Textiles’ connection to decorative art and everyday, domestic, “low” materials and techniques such as knitting, tapestry, embroidery and appliqué (a forerunner of collage and assemblage) was exploited as a component of feminist critique and politics.

The different themes of the exhibition overlap one another. The textile narrative in the form of abstractions and patterns gets tangled up with textiles as commodity, software and system builder. Textiles’ plasticity and need for support are exploited in new sculptural expressions and performances while also providing them with an emotional register – all of this becomes meaningful as an act of resistance in a more anti-hierarchical, playful and ambiguous art world from the 1960s until today.

Selected works

Seminars in conjunction with the exhibition

October 5 at 6pm:Panel discussion Textile Emancipation. Moderator: Annika Öhrner. Participants: Gunilla Lundahl writer, Patrik Steorn Director Thielska Art Gallery, Johanna Rosenqvist associate professor at Konstfack, Bella Rune Professor at Konstfack. Held in Swedish.

October 26 at 6pm: Lecture with T’ai Smith. The lecture will be held in English.

November 9 at 6pm: Following the song’s threads: From traditional textiles to new technologies, Artist Lecture by Paola Torres Núñez del Prado. The lecture will be held in English.

November 16 at 6pm: Molas. Lecture and Workshop with Tomas Woodski. RSVP by info@marabouparken.se.

November 23 at 6pm: Lecture with Michael Barrett and Matt Smith. The lecture will be held in English.

November 30 at 6pm: Lecture with Tom Sandqvist about his book Born in a Shtetl and Sonia Delaunay.

All seminars are included in the admission 50sek. 

Learn more

The exhibition is accompanied by a programme of discussions and lectures as well as a collaboration with students from Konstfack, the University College of Arts Craft and Design, Stockholm and St. Martins Design Gymnasium, Sundbyberg.

Thanks to:
Lennart och Margareta Rodhes Konstvetenskapliga Stiftelse
Malmö Art Museum
Moderna Museet
Det Nya Museet
Henrik Horn
Big Image

Nisrine Boukhari, Santiago Mostyn, Johanna Steindorf

Curators: Elena Jarl & Iliane Kiefer

Rethinking Flânerie is a group exhibition at Marabouparken that presents artworks by the international artists Nisrine Boukhari, Santiago Mostyn and Johanna Steindorf, who challenge the well-known concept of the flâneur in the 21st century. The exhibition curated by Elena Jarl and Iliane Kiefer, will feature photography, films and installations, which raise questions about gender, migration, home and exile.

The figure of the flâneur which was revived in French literature in the 19th century, has until today been widely debated in various disciplines. In the 20th century, artists reused flânerie and created new strategies of walking in the city to problematize the effects of capitalism on a changing urban landscape. Even if certain historical legacies still shape the perception of the flâneur today, Nisrine Boukhari, Santiago Mostyn and Johanna Steindorf show how present manifestations may be a necessity. As contemporary wanderers, travellers and even as a flâneuse they show new strategies to process personal conflicts and social inequalities. The artworks offer different means to experience a variety of narratives, encouraging the audience to rethink flânerie today.

The exhibition at Marabouparken will be accompanied by Johanna Steindorf’s audio-walk The Strange Half-Absence of Wandering at Night starting at Marabouparken. In this audio-walk, participants accompany a female protagonist through the park and neighborhood at dusk. The walk reflects upon the female flâneur – the flâneuse – and the situation for women in public space. It mixes narrative, text excerpts, music and field recordings. The sun sets while the participant walks, bringing out other qualities of this environment.

Lear more about the audio-walk

The event and exhibition are made possible with the support from Stockholms stad and Stockholm University and are part of the degree project within Curating Art, International Master’s Programme at Stockholm University.

Nisrine Boukhari (b.1980) is an installation and mixed media artist from Syria. Since 2014 she is working on her Ph.D. at the University for Applied Arts in Vienna. In her investigations she explores the contemporary wanderer, which entails both the physical and mental movements that influence our perception of place. Her art has been shown in various venues in Sweden including Botkyrka konsthall, Bildmuseet Umeå and HangmenProjects. She has also been presented in international venues and festivals.
www.nisrineboukhari.com

Santiago Mostyn (b. 1981) is a a photographer, writer, filmmaker and performance artist from San Francisco/Trinidad based in Stockholm who makes prints, videos and books based on personal interactions with subcultural communities throughout the world. Mostyn is a graduate of Yale University and the Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm, and has exhibited internationally at venues including Mass MoCA, Kunst-Werke Berlin, Art Basel Miami Beach and Fotografiska, Stockholm.
www.santiagomostyn.info

Johanna Steindorf ( Johanna Steindorf (b.1982) is a German-Brazilian media artist based in Germany. She holds a Ph.D. from the Bauhaus-University in Weimar’s Media Arts department. Her research is based on the audio-walk as an artistic strategy to highlight questions of gender and migration. She is currently a teacher and research assistant at University of Cologne and has participated in various international conferences. Her work has mostly been presented in Germany and Brazil, the show at Marabouparken is her first exhibition in Sweden.
www.johannasteindorf.de

Elena Jarl & Iliane Kiefer
Elena Jarl has a background in classical music and opera and a Bachelor’s degree in Cultural Sciences with the main subject Art History from Stockholm University. Iliane Kiefer studied her Bachelor in Social Sciences and Philosophy with the major subject Cultural Sciences in Leipzig, Germany. Both are pursuing the Master’s degree in Curating Art at Stockholm University. They have merged their interests in art and curating in their non-profit organisation gap-art: a platform for critical perspectives in art.
www.gap-art.org

2015

Seeing Through

This fall Marabouparken art centre will be presenting two solo shows with artists Anna Nordquist Andersson and David Claerbout, who in different ways use images as tools for seeing. Through their images we can revisit history, memory and even stay lingering in a fleeting moment. Both artists manipulate their material and create complex images that give the spectators a chance to contemplate a piece of time from new perspectives.

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In her exhibition Genomsyn / Seeing Through, Malmö-based artist Anna Nordquist Andersson presents different but closely related groups of works that are linked by a wide-ranging interest in the power of the gaze. A central concern of these works is the gaze and the manner in which we can use images as a tool to see. But whose gaze is seeing and what is seen by the gaze? In a feminist and surrealist tradition, Anna Nordquist Andersson creates playful and critical collages by making incisions in the media images that have shaped our perception of reality since the early 1960s. In the group of works entitled I See Through You (2008–2012), Anna Nordquist Andersson uses a scalpel to cut through layers of magazine pages, revealing eyes that gaze out from a spread in which they were never intended to be seen. The transformation that occurs when these primarily female eyes are dislocated from their original context, in one of the magazine’s advertisements, and placed in their new location, on the magazine’s cover or in a feature article, is quite simply dizzying. Seductive and graceful gazes suddenly become threatening, sad, melancholy or humorous.

Anna Nordquist Andersson was born in 1976 in Malmö. She has participated in numerous exhibitions at galleries and art institutions both in Sweden and abroad, including: Galleri Ping-Pong, Malmö (Black Chamber, 2014); Trondheim Kunstmuseum (Lips Painted Red, 2013); Turku Art Museum, Finland (DEJA VU 2012); Peter Lav Gallery, Copenhagen (I See Through You, 2012); Malmö Art Museum (The Real Thing, 2008); Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA (Facades, 2007) and Kunsthal Charlottenburg, Copenhagen (From Dust to Dusk, 2003). In spring 2015 Anna Nordquist Andersson was artist-in-residence at the Nirox Foundation in Johannesburg.

Anna Nordquist Andersson, I See Through You (Women Emancipation), collage 2008-2012
Anna Nordquist Andersson, I See Through You (The Guru), collage 2008-2012

This fall Marabouparken art centre will be presenting two solo shows with artists Anna Nordquist Andersson and David Claerbout, who in different ways use images as tools for seeing. Through their images we can revisit history, memory and even stay lingering in a fleeting moment. Both artists manipulate their material and create complex images that give the spectators a chance to contemplate a piece of time from new perspectives.

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The Belgian artist David Claerbout’s work sits at the crossroads between photography and film, encouraging crosspollination where photographs are given movement and film is brought almost to a halt. Close-ups of faces and architectural details to the seaside vista echo the panoramic sense of time that he seeks to articulate. His works mainly deals with a single situation, a single image, sometime presented from a myriad of positions. As in The Algiers’ Sections of a Happy Moment, set in a small soccer field on a roof of the Kasbah of Algiers where young Maghrebians pause their soccer game as one of the players feeds a group of seagulls. To get a sense of the multiplicity of this single moment and the varied ways that it might be committed to memory, more than 50 000 photographs were captured and finally 600 projected photos were carefully composed to create this continuous moment in time. The succession of images of this “happy” moment reflects an aim to open up what the artist terms as “the suspicious gaze” turned against a particular group of people. The exhibition is the first major presentation of David Claerbout’s work in Sweden.

David Claerbout har ställt ut internationellt och haft separatutställningar på bland andra Nederlands Fotomuseum, Rotterdam (2014), Kunsthalle Mainz (2013); Secession, Wien (2012); Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv (2012); Parasol Unit, London (2012); Wiels, Bryssel (2011); SFMoMA, San Francisco (2011); Pinakothek der Moderne, München (2010); DE PONT, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tilburg (2009), och Centre Pompidou, Paris (2007). Hans arbeten har också visats i internationella grupputställningar som Sydneybiennalen (2013); Sharjahbiennalen (2013); Moskvabiennalen för samtidskonst (2013), och São Paulo-biennalen (2010).

David Claerbout, The Algiers Sections of A Happy Moment, video 2008

David Claerbout, The Quiet Shore, video 2011

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In the exhibition Participant Observers, Henrik Andersson completes his investigation of an area in Ursvik in northern Sundbyberg where the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), was located until 2005. Using material from, among others, the FOI art collection, the photographic collection of the Museum of Sundbyberg and the archive of the Public Art Agency Sweden, Henrik Andersson traces changes in physical as well as mental landscapes. In these times when armed conflicts seem to creep ever closer, Henrik Andersson brings to the fore FOI’s placement in Sundbyberg, its connection to the period after the Second World War and its changing social climate. In the wake of the activities of FOI, we discover art, protocols, photographs and inventories that raise questions: What role have art and artists played in the Swedish national defence? And what is the status of the Swedish peace movement today?

A wooded area the size of a small nature reserve south of Järvafältet in northern Sundbyberg, Ursvik, was until recently the location of the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI). From 1930 onwards, a branch line of the Northern Main Line carried shipments of ammunition into a large rock shelter. The area contained shooting ranges, administration offices and depots, and, most importantly, high level research was conducted there. The research included everything from the development of Swedish nuclear weapons to medical research into surgical methods of treating crush injuries. The activities were top secret and what really went on behind the fence remains shrouded in mystery. In the early 1960s, public support for the Swedish nuclear programme waned and in 1961 the first protest march against the atomic bomb in Sweden went to Ursvik. Pictures from the march are preserved in the Museum of Sundbyberg. The Swedish Defence premises in Ursvik also housed something else, an art collection, which was primarily acquired by the Public Art Agency Sweden. An art collection at a secret location – what was it doing there?

– Henrik Andersson

The exhibition Participant Observers is a part of Henrik Andersson’s Marabouparken Lab project. These serve as local collaborative projects that link artists, local actors and common spaces in Sundbyberg with the aim of enhancing our collective memory connected to sites, and hopefully, at the same time, making the current societal development emerge in a clearer light.

Henrik Andersson (born 1973 in Gothenburg) is based in Stockholm and studied Fine Art and Curating at Konstfack, the University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm. He has exhibited at, among others, Moderna Museet, Index and the Tirana Biennial in Albania. From 2013–2014 he worked with Asger Jorn’s photographic archive in the project Museum Jorn that was exhibited at the Baltic Art Center in Visby. He is a member of the editorial board of the journal Paletten and has previously worked as a curator at Röda Sten Konsthall and taught at the School of Photography in Gothenburg.

henrikanderssonart.tumblr.com

Nothin’ Shakin’ but the Leaves on the Trees

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The first solo exhibition of Edward Clydesdale Thomson in Sweden brings together a series of works which exist on the margins of inside and outside, questioning the relation between landscape, ideology and identity. Here, one group of works presented indoors act as a precursor for a new work outdoors, five sculptures commissioned specially for Marabouparken. At Marabouparken konsthall the artist has transformed the gallery into a metaphorical space of everyday objects, images and forms that blur the boundaries between interior and exterior. Drawing from the topiary garden and his own childhood memories, Thomson presents garden as cultural construct, but also as an element of imagination and memory.

On the large grass lawn of Marabouparken five sculptures bear references of historical forest use and the industrial-scale growing of spruces. Edward Clydesdale Thomson’s sculptures speak of the different roles the trees in the forests have played in Swedish culture as timber, capital and cultural environment. This work, commissioned for Marabouparken, is also reflection on the nature of the park itself. Marabouparken was laid out to give the illusion of a naturally emerged oasis – a place for physical and spiritual recreation that would also create a strong sense of connection to the company and thus further loyalty and productivity. This is where the ideology about Marabouparken and the Swedish forest start to overlap – as models of belief and productivity.

The narrative of forestry use in Sweden can be read in spiritual, economic and moral terms that define the complex politics of our relation to land use. Notions of identity and the modernistic ideals of productivity produce a responsibility for ‘nature’ that pairs morality and capitalist ideals.

– Edward Clydesdale Thomson

Edward Clydesdale Thomson (b. 1982, Scottish/Danish artist based in Rotterdam) is a graduate of the MFA program at the Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam and the BArch program at the Glasgow School of Art. He has been resident artist at Iaspis, Stockholm, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin and the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam. Notable recent exhibitions include: 25 jaar Stadscollectie Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (2013), The Distracted Gardener & The Plumbing Subverter, Yeo Workshop, Singapore (2013), causa finalis, Galerie Fons Welters, Amsterdam (2012), Secret Gardens, TENT, Rotterdam (2012), Prix de Rome 2011, SMART Project Space, Amsterdam (2011).

http://www.edwardthomson.net/

The exhibition Nothin’ Shakin’ but the Leaves on the Trees was made possible by generous financial support from the Mondriaan Fund and Stichting Stokroos. 

mondriaanstokroosgrolsch

Margaret Raspé and Anna Sjödahl at Marabouparken konsthall
Joanna Lombard at Konsthall C

Marabouparken konsthall and Konsthall C are delighted to present the first exhibition of Mierle Laderman Ukeles in Sweden and a joint exhibition and events programme entitled From Her House including the work of Anna Sjödahl, Margaret Raspé and Joanna Lombard and a weekly film programme with expanded artistic examinations of the home, domestic (maintenance) work and the gendered division of labour.

At Marabouparken the exhibition From Her House presents key works by Swedish artist Anna Sjödahl and German artist Margaret Raspé; contemporaries of Ukeles. This accompanying exhibition provides key coordinates for understanding how feminist art practices were cultivated during the 1960s and 70s.

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In a quest to merge different types of environments and activities into a manageable situation, Anna Sjödahl depicted her own reality in order to show that the conditions of art can also spring from the “messiness” of everyday life. As one of the early protagonists with a feminist agenda, her works, which drew on everyday motifs of household objects, mothers of small children and family quarrels in drab housing project environments, provoked and gave rise to debates about the oppression of women, housewives working outside the home and the production order that only values salaried work. Several of Anna Sjödahl’s paintings such as Vår i Hallonbergen (Spring in Hallonbergen) and Barbro drömmer (Barbro Dreams) have become modern classics and symbols of inner-city boredom and alienation as well as women’s lack of freedom. The exhibition at Marabouparken konsthall displays a selection of drawings and sculptures, primarily from the artist’s first, much-praised exhibition Vision och möda (Vision and Toil) at Gallery Prisma II in 1970, and documentation and original images from Bilder på stan – Alternativ reklam (City Images – Alternative Advertising) from 1969 to 1972.

Artist Margaret Raspé draws on the daily banality of domestic tasks to highlight their conditions of production. In 1971 she developed what she called the “camera helmet” a construction which enabled her to “instrumentalise her eye” and focus through film, the work she carried out everyday. Here both domestic work and art work are captured through the same process, highlighting their shared conditions of production. By rendering visual this work Raspé sought to connect to current debates around reproductive labour and like the artist Mierle Laderman Ukeles, reinstate its significance. In the exhibition three films are displayed selected from the series of “camera helmet” works.

At Konsthall C artist Joanna Lombard presents new work in which the artist draws on her struggle to breast feed her first child. Produced over 30 years after Ukeles, Sjödahl and Raspé, Lombards’s work is a salient reminder of the shared challenges faced by mother’s and the need to continually address them.

Anna Sjödahl (born 1934 in Gothenburg, died 2001) studied at The University College of Arts, Crafts and Design 1953–58 and at The Royal Institute of Art 1959–1964. The work of Anna Sjödahl has been shown retrospective at Borås konstmuseum 1988 and Liljevalchs konsthall 1999 and been part of group exhibitions like Konstfeminism at amongst others Dunkers Kulturhus and Liljevalchs konsthall 2006, Hjärtat sitter till vänster at Göteborgs konstmuseum 1998, Vi arbetar för livet at Liljevalchs konsthall 1980 as well as Kvinnoliv at Lunds konsthall and Kvinnfolk at Kulturhuset in Stockholm 1974.

Margaret Raspé (born in Breslau, 1933) studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Munich and the Academy of Arts Berlin. From 1971 to 1974 she made films with the self-developed “camera helmet” recording everyday female acts within the kitchen. Between 1978–85 Raspé produced the documentary filmAnastenaria – Feast of the Feuerlaufer of Lagadas as well as working on the project unheeded forms of pro-duction at NGBK Berlin in 1982. Since 2000 she has been working on the project Sense on the Greek Island of Karpathos inviting artists and friends on the island to contribute to the work. In 2014 the Arsenale, Berlin held an exhibition of her film works called Alle Tage wieder – let them swing! which included a display of Raspé’s materials and objects including the pioneering “camera helmet”.

Joanna Lombard (born 1972 in Algeria by Swedish-French parents) graduated from the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm 2010. She often works with staging situations that have an authentic background which deal with issues of identity, origin and alienation. In her films the narratives are often deliberately ambiguous and sway between the child and the adult’s perspective. Her practice explores the meanings of memories and extracted stories that were generated during her childhood in the seventies. Exhibitions Ghosts, Spies, And Grandmothers – The 8th Seoul Art Biennale, South Korea (2014), Kapitel ett –Är där här. Gallery Id:I, Stockholm (2014), The Society without qualities, curated by Lars Bang Larsen Tensta Konsthall (2013).

Anna Sjödahl
Margaret Raspé

Film and events program

Beginning with a survey of Mierle Laderman Ukeles and her significant examination of Maintenance Art Work between 1969–1980 the exhibitions and events programme delve into expanded artistic examinations of the home, domestic (maintenance) work and the gendered division of labour; asking how these radical practices can prove relevant today. The accompanying film programme will be shown at Marabouparken konsthall and offers weekly reflections on feminist struggles battled in the everyday. Two showreels of artists film and video work punctuate the programme which include a number of work from the Cinenova collection, dedicated to distributing films and videos made by women.

Learn more about the public programme

Maintenance Art Works 1969–1980

Marabouparken konsthall and Konsthall C are delighted to present the first exhibition of Mierle Laderman Ukeles in Sweden and a joint exhibition and events programme entitled From Her House including the work of Anna Sjödahl, Margaret Raspé and Joanna Lombard and a weekly film programme with expanded artistic examinations of the home, domestic (maintenance) work and the gendered division of labour.

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Mierle Laderman Ukeles (born 1939 in Denver, USA) took a seminal position in early conceptual and feminist art. Her work looked to highlight otherwise overlooked aspects of social production and questions the hierarchies of different forms of work, especially of housework and low-wage labour. Her early work was experimental, and visually and symbolically conveyed her own personal expression and turmoil as well as the social unrest surrounding events, such as the women’s movement and the Vietnam War. Ukeles was trained in America in the 1960s, in an artistic climate which considered conceptual frameworks and the process of making art as important as the visual experience. Many works of Ukeles have originated in a performance, with the artist undertaking actions or tasks, which would then be documented through photography, text or film for presentation in a gallery setting. Other important influences for Ukeles were the political debates of civil rights activism and identity politics. In an atmosphere of departure, Ukeles and many other artists expanded their concerns towards the wider socio-political discussion, and engaged actively with real-world problems.

Ukeles early work displayed at Marabouparken konsthall show an array of projects that evolve from her own struggle at home. Born from the frustration that her responsibilities as a mother were seen as a distraction to her art work she sought to test the boundaries of art by seeing both these forms of work as the same. Here the value systems associated with domestic labour were brought into focus with the value systems attached to the white cube gallery. In both of these ‘spaces’ the labour of their maintenance, upkeep and care was to be invisible, cleaned away to leave only the smiling house wife or the art piece on the plinth. By challenging the socio-political landscape she herself was forced to negotiate, Ukeles found a way in which her personal struggle could find common ground with wider political battles.

The presentation of Ukeles’ work across Marabouparken konsthall and Konsthall C highlights her movement from the home to the realm of the public. Marabouparken konsthall will exhibit Ukeles’ early work reflecting on the seminal performances of cleaning actions within her home expanding a critique to the art institution. Konsthall C will present the later long-term project <em>Touch Sanitation</em> (1977–1980) a project involving Ukeles’ residency at the New York Department of Sanitation and a performance in which she dedicated herself to thank and shake hands with every Maintenance worker in New York City.

The exhibition is organised in collaboration with the Grazer Kunstverein and curated by Krist Gruijthuijsen, director of the Grazer Kunstverein, Austria.
Learn more about Mierle Laderman Ukeles  long-term project Touch Sanitation at Konsthall C or see the collaborative public programme 

Mierle Laderman Ukeles (born 1939 in Denver Colorado) studied at Barnard College and Pratt Institute in NewYork. Since the 1970s, she has exhibited and performed widely, among others in C7500, Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford (1973), Issue: Social Strategies by Women Artists, Institute of Contemporary Art, London (1980, both curated by Lucy Lippard), Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York (1998), WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, PS1, New York (2007–2008) and the International Armory Art Fair, New York (2007), Maintenance Art Works 1969–1980, Grazer Kunstverein (2013), Maintenance Required, The Kitchen, New York (2013, organised by the Whitney Independent Study Program), and at the 13th Istanbul Biennial.

2014

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On Invasive Grounds
Katja Aglert
22 February–19 June

In the exhibition On Invasive Grounds, artist Katja Aglert explores some of the ideas related to the widespread notion of a lost natural, primordial state, characterised by harmony and balance, which we strive to re-establish. The exhibition traces the human hand in the proliferation of artificial light, explores the Arctic of male myths and the flora of the World Heritage site of Suomenlinna in neon-based work and video installations. Eventually a completely different idea about the earth’s original state emerges: a world that has always been, and continues to be, in perpetual flux, a world characterised by constant interaction between animals, nature and human beings, the latter of which may be regarded as the earth’s most invasive species.

CURRENT PROGRAM RELATED TO THE EXHIBITION

Thursday 3 April at 6 pm

Book release of Winter Event – antifreeze, Winter Event – antifreeze, Winter Event – antifreeze, Winter Event – antifreeze and lecture Climate Change and Contemporary Art of the Polar Regions: Gender after Ice

Book release of Winter Event – antifreeze, Winter Event – antifreeze, Winter Event – antifreeze, Winter Event – antifreeze which is a part of the art project with a similar title. Publishers are Art and Theory Publishing and editors Katja Aglert and Stefanie Hessler.

Lisa Bloom, one of the authors in the book, will give a lecture on her upcoming book Gender After Ice: Climate Change and Contemporary Art of the Polar Regions and how contemporary artistic practices are re-visualizing the Arctic and Antarctic in response to the issues of global climate change. Lisa Bloom is an author and teacher who divides her time between San Diego and New York. Bloom is currently a visiting scholar at UCLA’s Center for the Study of Women.

Participators in the book Winter Event – antifreeze:  Katja Aglert, Lisa Bloom, Sabeth Buchmann, Stefanie Hessler.

The lecture will be held in English 

More about Katja Aglert

More about Lisa Bloom 

Wednesday 23 April at 6 pm: Radical Gardening

George McKay gives a lecture based on his book Radical Gardening: Politics, Idealism and Rebellion in the Garden of how parks and gardens were favored locations for alternative, radical cultures like music festivals, the peace movement and various kinds of political activism. McKay is a professor in Cultural Studies at Salford University in England.

The lecture will be held in English 

More about George McKay

Ann Böttcher
Kajsa Dahlberg
Olafur Eliasson
Carl Fredrik Hill
Joachim Koester
EvaMarie Lindahl
Sivert Lindblom
Anna Ling
Gerhard Nordström
Henrik Olesen
Nina Saunders
Lars-Andreas Tovey Kristiansen
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With the point of departure in Marabouparken’s own history and what it can tell us about the ideals and the time in which it was designed, we have chosen works from the collection of Malmö Art Museum in which nature, and that which is considered natural, are the elusive reference points of the beautiful and the normal, as well as of the threatening and the uncontrollable in our lives.

The exhibition Our Inner Nature gathers twelve prominent Nordic artists whose works span the 1880s to the present day. Via nature the works reflect and comment on our civilisation and cultural history in which the concept of nature often starts and ends in our own hands. In an act of circular reasoning we define what is natural, apply it to nature and then refer to our constructed image of nature as proof for, and argument against, the unnatural, the abnormal – that which does not belong.

Erik Bünger, Written On Tablets of Flesh 
The Great Learning Orchestra, a4 rum
Angelica Mesisti, Citizens Band

Under the heading No Sound is Innocent, three parallel exhibitions are brought together which in various ways relate to sound and listening, voice and music.

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Erik Bünger, A Lecture on Schizophonia, video 2007–2011. Foto: Jean-Baptiste Béranger
Erik Bünger, The Girl Who Never Was, 2013
Erik Bünger
Written on Tablets of Flesh

The exhibition Written on Tablets of Flesh is a trilogy of essayistic works by artist and composer Erik Bünger, accompanied by his live performances and a display of artefacts that recur in the films. Centred on the human voice and employing humour, the exhibition chops and changes between history, philosophy, media and popular culture to explore the contradictory relationship between the voice, the body, music, language and technology. Here the voice and music are not the phenomena that primary give rise to a personal, human presence and interpersonal communication; rather they are a strange being that allows a non-human entity to enter the human body and take control over it.
www.erikbunger.com

The Great Learning Orchestra
a4 rum

a4 rum is a project that stretches the boundaries of visual art and music, initiated in 2004 by Leif Jordansson for the Great Learning Orchestra. What began as an open invitation to contribute a composition, which could be in the format of traditional musical notation, written instructions, graphic images or photographs, has now grown into a comprehensive archive of more than 140 compositions that each fits on an A4 sheet.

The exhibition a4 rum is a combination of an installation and a concert in which hundreds of compositions can be both viewed and heard. The presentation of a4 rum at Marabouparken konsthall is the most comprehensive presentation to date and comprises a large number of new compositions by well-known artists, musicians, etc.

The Great Learning Orchestra will perform several of the exhibited compositions in Marabouparken on October 1 and 22 and November 12 and 26.
www.thegreatlearningorchestra.se

Angelica Mesiti
Citizens Band

The exhibition Citizens Band comprises four films that document musicians who work outside the established music scene. The films were shot in ordinary public places, from a public swimming pool and the Metro in Paris to the streets of Australia, where both the music and the context in which it is performed depict a life in exile.
www.angelicamesiti.com

riksemslogo

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Summer programme in Marabouparken

Uppehåll is a summer programme held in Marabouparken with a mix of performances, concerts, theatre, sculptures and audio works. The summer program will be in parallel with the exhibitions Our Inner Nature and On Invasive Grounds through 19th of June when the art centre closes and focuses entirely on the park space.

Artists participating: Katja Aglert, Kerstin Bergendal, Bouillon Group (Natalia Vatsadze, Teimuraz Kartlelishvili, Vladimer Khartishvili, Konstantine Kitiashvili, Ekaterina Ketsbaia, Zurab Kikvadze), Freedom on Wheels, Hägerstens Botaniska Trädgård (Johan Eriksson, Sofia Hultin and Ingela Ihrman), Peter Geschwind, Theodor Klingberg Geschwind, Olof Olsson.

2013

Let Everybody Come Out Today

By seemingly simple gestures, Ferhat Özgür connects the individual reality to larger issues of the human condition in a changing world, where the city of Ankara represents that which constructs, limits and enables our lives. Özgür’s art is characterised by a personal narrative voice, and the social and political issues that he raises are relevant far beyond the borders of Ankara and Turkey.

In 2002 Ferhat Özgür asked the neighbours in the street where he grew up to pose for a group photo outside their homes. Having moved from the Turkish countryside to Ankara, they built their homes on the outskirts of the city. Now, their part of town was due for bulldozing. In the diptych Let Everybody Come Out Today, the neighbours stare grimly at the camera, marked by life. It is a key work in the oeuvre of Özgür, who for years has been critically following the changes taking place in his home environment, where smaller villages and informal settlements are torn down and replaced by a growing number of skyscrapers and shopping malls.

A chronicler of his immediate surroundings, Özgür portrays with humour and warmth the challenges facing the individual in a country where the lines between Islam and Christianity, Turkish traditions and Western influences are blurred and constantly renegotiated.

The video I Can Sing shows how high-rise buildings are appearing between the minarets that have traditionally dominated the city of Ankara. A woman wearing a traditional headscarf stands against the backdrop of her reconstructed home, moving her lips to Jeff Buckley’s cover of Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah. This classic song, whose lyrics have been the subject of many interpretations, refers, in this double cover, to how the changing city has received both praise and resistance.

Well it goes like this / The fourth, the fifth / The minor fall and the major shift

Even the major key of the Western popular song seems to be an indicator of uprooting as it obliterates the minor tones characteristic of traditional Turkish music. Swaying to Hallelujah, spreading her arms to the sky, the woman becomes an embodiment of societal upheaval and change.

The video work Metamorphosis Chat (2010) and the more recent Women in Love (2013) both cite the narrative frame of Turkish soap operas. The actors in Özgür’s films are often acquaintances and relatives. Together they seek images and gestures to visually express the difficulties facing especially women living in a patriarchal society and in a present that is constantly producing new realities and questioning traditional ideas of a successful life.

In Metamorphosis Chat, Özgür’s mother, who wears a traditional headscarf, meets a neighbour, a teacher in modern dress, for tea. The women decide to switch roles and begin to exchange clothes. Özgür’s influence as director recedes as the women, allowing themselves to get carried away by the merriment of dressing up, become their own authors. Their hearty friendliness, their openness in dealing with what might otherwise be embarrassing, their laughing at each other and themselves – all poke fun at the fear and aggressive moralising found in debates on symbols with religious connotations.

In Özgür’s latest work, Women in Love, a group of middle-aged widows are reminiscing about their lives with their husbands. The conversation encompasses their vulnerability, fragility and isolation as child brides; identifies painful descriptions of domestic violence and alcohol abuse and heightens our awareness of the nature of matrimonial loyalty through stories of love and loss.

Mum 1954/2011 is a double portrait of Ferhat Özgür’s mother. More than 60 years have passed between the two images and we are reminded of how we age and our relationship with our parents who were once young men and women. This work also refers to the modernisation process in Turkey where Özgür’s mother represents the many women who, in the beginning of the 1950s, migrated from the countryside to the big city of Ankara. Instead of integrating themselves into the more liberal lifestyle of the capital city, many women chose to preserve the traditional values and clothes from their villages. These young rural women grew more conservative in the country’s urban centre. As a young woman in 1954, Özgür’s mother did not wear a headscarf, it only became part of her identity when she moved to Ankara.

A common theme for the majority of Özgür’s photographic works is the city of Ankara, which he has described as a being that infiltrates his bloodstream, lives with him, poisons him but also vitalises and energises him. In Our Neighbourhood, three young boys are gazing out over a changing urban landscape. A number of high-rise buildings are under construction, half-finished houses are sprouting up from the arid ground next to more informal, smaller houses in the nearby slum area. In The City’s Breath Inside Me, air-filled plastic bags are hovering over the poor area of the city, where Ferhat Özgür grew up. Having no money to buy kites, Özgür and his childhood friends made their own out of plastic bags, which, when filled with air, flew as well as the shop-bought ones.

In one of Ankara’s slum areas, the residents gather at a building site for a communal embrace. Özgür began working on Embrace just before the Iraq War started and draws a parallel between the changing city and the fragile peace in the region. The work also forms an association to the dream of a better life, in an area where many people live in houses with protruding iron bars, waiting for the day when they will be able to add another floor to their homes.

Ferhat Özgür (b. 1965) grew up in Ankara and lives and works in Istanbul where he teaches at the Istanbul Kultur University. Özgür’s work has been presented at numerous institutions and biennials all over the world, including the 6th Berlin Biennial; 10th International Istanbul Biennial; 1st Tirana Biennial; 3rd Örebro Open Art Biennial; 1st Mardin Biennial; 1st & 3rd Sinopale; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin; Museum der Moderne, Salzburg; MUMOK, Vienna; Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin; Ludwig Forum, Aachen; Mattress Factory Art Museum, Pittsburgh; Kunsthalle Winterthur, Switzerland; Magazin4, Bregenz; Casino Luxembourg – Forum d’art contemporain, Luxembourg; Zone Contemporaine, Bern and MoMA PS1, New York.

Manifesto

Anna Witt is a German artist (b. 1981) who often works in different local contexts with performative interventions in public space involving strangers, often passers-by. The works in the exhibition Manifesto are connected to a new site-specific work that the artist has been working on in Sundbyberg during the winter. A common theme of the new work and the works in the exhibition at Marabouparken art space is that they act as playfully staged situations where people can express their ideas about society – a characteristic feature of Anna Witt’s artistic practice.

Thinking seen as an action in itself is something that pervades Anna Witt’s artistic practice. For the work Radical Thinking (video installation, 2009), the artist spent two weeks in the shopping mall Lugner City in Vienna asking people to develop radical thoughts and if she could film them while they were thinking. “I feel that the action of thinking provides the person being portrayed with a certain power(scatch of an alternative realityattention ever connected to theirymtionding. n. You can observe somebody thinking but you can never catch up with their thoughts.” In this and other works the artist investigates ideas about who can be political and what the political means in everyday life. In Empower Me (video and cardboard signs, 2007), Anna Witt “kidnapped” random passers-by in the street and brought them into the exhibition space where she had built a small stage. Once in the room they were given the opportunity to define the demands for their release and act as hostages in a film. Anna Witt attempts, in different ways, to provoke confrontation between the individual and the surrounding world, whether in body language, text or via images. In The Eyewitness (video, 2012) we follow a group of children aged 8-10 who are discussing current news topics with each other in a room with blown-up images from the Reuters press archive. The children, reflecting the grown-up world with their mix of facts, misunderstandings, acquired opinions and their own ideas, allow us to take a closer look at how we actually handle these kinds of images.

Together with the residents of Hallonbergen Anna Witt has composed a manifesto that will be conveyed in a parade during the spring, the so-called Everything Can Happen Parade, where the participants, using sculptural letters, will form the text as the parade moves along. Manifestoes are historically connected to a certain cultural scene or to a political agenda whereas the Hallonbergen manifesto will voice a multitude of perspectives and levels. Concrete topics in Hallonbergen, private matters and global concerns face each other and create a private but at the same universal agenda for the future.

The Everything Can Happen Parade has been commissioned by Marabouparken Lab.. Under this heading we initiate local, collaborative projects that develop through interaction between artist, commissioner, residents and stakeholders. As the name suggests these project are allowed to be experimental, open-ended and explorative and can be presented both in and outside the gallery space in Marabouparken and around Sundbyberg.

Anna Witt
In addition to her project in Sundbyberg she is currently working on an exhibition at the MOBY Museum of BAT YAM in Israel about resignation, corruption and conspiracy. At Emscherkunst in a former industrial area in Germany she is also collaborating with the Swedish design group Uglycute in creating a long-term performance with a “street gang” who will be transforming large amounts of bulky items in public space into new “shiny” street furniture. Anna Witt participated in the Hembyg(g)d exhibition at Marabouparken art space in 2012.

Meriç Algün Ringborg, Magnus Bärtås, Kay Rosen and Mladen Stilinović
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The exhibition ABCDEFGHI presents works by four artists who all share an interest in the linguistic. The first nine letters of the alphabet would not signify much were it not for the fact that the final two letters appear in a different colour and form the word HI. The title of the exhibition, which is a work by the American artist Kay Rosen, is a greeting as well as an invitation to look closer at language and the ability of words to assume various functions, meanings and behaviours, as conveyors, generators, signs and images.

Kay Rosen, Meriç Algün Ringborg, Magnus Bärtås and Mladen Stilinović work in different geographic contexts, have different native tongues but all use language as method, form and image in order to direct our attention to its impact on our way of speaking, thinking, reading, communicating and perceiving the world. With small additions, emphases and dislocations, their works open up our way of observing and comprehending things which we perhaps otherwise would not have noticed, and give equal prominence to misreadings and misunderstandings as to precision and exactitude.

Annie Vigier & Franck Apertet (les gens d’Uterpan)

Topologie is a 10 day-performance that intertwine the theatrical elements of time, space and action with public space. Five dancers explore the boundaries of the stage while transforming a geographical area, in this case the entire city of Sundbyberg, to a site for a performance. les gens d’Uterpan create critical examinations of the norms that govern different art forms through perfomance but also the social conventions that regulate every-day life. Topologie is a part of the re|action project where public space is a point of departure and an arena for questioning the status of artists, the responsability of citizens and the norms and habits that form the basis of society. In the talk Annie Vigier and Franck Apertet will discuss several of the projects within re|action. Amongst them: ”Audience” carried out in Paris 2011 and ”You are a dancer” that was conceived for the Baltic Art Centre in Gotland, Sweden in 2012. ”In our work the audience is often not aware of what will happen. Sometimes the audience is provoked in different manners and sometimes it is intentionally not targeted. For les gens d’Uterpan the audience is made up by citizen, with whom we’re challenging the notion of public space.”

More about Topologie
Every day inbetween June 10–19 the dancers Anna Axiotis, Tove Brunberg, Robin Dingemans, Elias Girod and Moa Westerlund traverse the street, parks, residential areas, shops and institutions of Sundbyberg. The individual routes of the dancers is directed by the Toplogie graph a graphic figure that has been placed on the map of Sundbyberg and that cross through Marabouparken, the one-family house area Duvbo, the mall in Hallonbergen across the motorway E18 and up in the residential area Ursvik. The dancers do not wear special costumes or any other special tell tale signs that reveal their presence in the city. The choreography is decided by simple actions carried out along the way: gestures, physical and social behaviour, speed and movement annotated and repeated in exact detail every day. The graph brings together the dancers in specific places in specific spots. Only the repetition of movements in certain spots reveals the dancers.  The specifics traits of the city – environmental, social and urban become the props of the performance and the dimensions of the city determine the length of the performance. Every day the dancers probe deeper into the organisation of the city. The choreography builds up and becomes more and more complex.

Sound technician Nicolas Martz will follow the dancers during their movements through Sundbyberg to register the sounds that surround them. Their movements will be recorded and transformed into a sound track that will be broadcasted on the net and transmitted over the sound system in the restaurant at Marabouparken. The sound, the images and the information about the dancers whereabouts will be shown in the mediation point in the restaurant but also on the website of Marabouparken and on the website of les gens d’uterpan during the period June 10–19.

Photo: Mikaela Krestesen

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La vie en rose presents a selection of over 50 photographs taken in Mali’s capital Bamako, in the 1960s-1970s by the internationally acclaimed Malian photographer Malick Sidibé. The exhibition includes the iconic black-and-white photographs that have made Sidibé world famous: the parties in the 1960s, studio portraits and a selection of photographs from his archive. Presented is also a reconstruction of Sidibé’s legendary studio, which he set up in 1962 and continues to run with the help of his sons.

Recently, Mali has been wracked by a military coup and ethnic unrest, but in the 1960s, Mali was experiencing a burst of energy and optimism that followed upon its liberation from French colonialism. Malick Sidibé’s images unveil the magic and excitement of Bamako in those years when the desire to be together, of being part of history in its making seemed imperative. Positioned at the junction of Malian independence and a period of rapid modernisation, the works bear witness to the joy, insouciance, and confidence of Africa’s youth revolution.

The youths in Sidibé’s photographs are in contradiction not only with colonial-era studio photography, but also with the patterns of life that one would expect in a decolonised state. Many African independence leaders at the time criticised the youths for alienating themselves from the teachings of the national state, mimicking and assimilating the culture of the coloniser. What might not have been visible then is that through popular culture – by seizing upon their own individuality, looking like the modern black image detached from nation and tribe – important connections were made across national border with the black diaspora and international youth movements.

Although a small sampling of Sidibé’s oeuvre, La vie en rose captures the excitement of a generation who were free to deviate from social norms through a mixing of traditional and Western clothes and music.

Born in 1936 in Soloba, a village outside of Bamako, Malick Sidibé began his career as an apprentice to the French photographer Guillat-Guinard for whom he in 1957 started making his first reportages of parties, christenings and weddings. In 1962 he opened the Studio Malick, in the popular neighbourhood of Bagadadji, where he continued his activity as portraitist. At the same time Sidibé depicted the outdoor life of Bamako: people in nightclubs with exotic names that were opening everywhere in town and house parties spinning the latest James Brown album as wells as picnics on the banks of the river Niger. Sidibé was invited to all the big events: his fame was so great that if he could not participate, they would change the time or even the day of the event. In an interview with John Henley of the Guardian in 2010, Sidibé reflected on the burgeoning nightlife in Bamako:

“We were entering a new era, and people wanted to dance. Music freed us. Suddenly, young men could get close to young women, hold them in their hands. Before, it was not allowed. And everyone wanted to be photographed dancing up close. They had to see it!

In Sidibé’s studio portraits his subjects are often dressed in their finest clothes and accessories, including jewellery, purses, hats and occasionally props as Vespas and motorcycles, exuding a cool, hip, macho or seductive attitude. His photographs at parties capture a similar ambience, although the snapshots are constructed more formally.

Although many of Sidibé’s iconic images were taken almost fifty years ago, it is only recently that he has achieved acclaim. Since 2000, he has been the recipient of the Hasselblad Award (2003), the International Center of Photography Award for Lifetime Achievement (2009), as well as the Venice Biennale Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement (2007).

The exhibition La vie en rose is curated by Laura Serani and Laura Incardona and is made in collaboration with Collezione Maramotti, where it was first shown in 2010.

RELATED EVENTS

Two documentaries about Malick Sidibé will be on view during the exhibition period: Dolce Vita Africana (2008) by Cosima Spender and Malick Sidibé , le partage (2012) by Thomas Glaser and Franck Landron

Saturday, August 17, 2pm
Laura Serani will give a short introduction on African photography, the place of the portrait tradition, the role of the Rencontres de Bamako since the first edition in 1994. Her talk will include a conversation with Malick Sidibé, his vision of life and photography

Wednesday, September 18, 6pm
Madeleine Bergh talks about her experiences of travelling in Mali and shows the documentary Porträtt i Bamako about photographer Seydou Keita (created by Madeleine Bergh and Margareta Jonols).  Malick Sidibé’s work is discussed in relation to an on-going portrait tradition in Mali.

Wednesday, October 9, 6pm Note: The date has been changed 
Artist Arijana Kajfes talks to Fatoumata Diabaté about her work and what it is like being a female photographer in Mali. Arijana met Fatoumata through her art project Dérive:Tombouctou in Mali 2010, when she hired her as photographer. Their friendship has since deepened as Arijana returned to Mali several times to develop her work with EXP (Experiments in Xross cultural Practices), an organization that fosters artistic collaboration. During the talk Arijana will also show images from her artistic projects as well as her work with EXP.

Wednesday, October 23, 6pm
Eva-Lotta Holm Flach talks about the contemporary art scene in West Africa, highlighting a few specific artists.

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The Night Belongs to Us (a nous la nuit)

Marabouparken Art Gallery continues its Malian season by featuring Fatoumata Diabaté, one of the younger women photographers who have recently emerged on the West African photography scene. In The Night Belongs to Us (a nous la nuit) she captures her contemporaries in photographs of young people in the nocturnal bustle of the Mali capital.

The Night Belongs to Us (a nous la nuit) consists of a series of snapshots of nightlife in Bamako, the preceding moments in front of the mirror, slick moves on the dance floor, mobiles being checked and roving eyes eager for contact. Diabaté’s photos express a quality that is both elusive and intimate in every situation. Her camera captures a cleavage or a shimmering dress as in a quick sketch or scribbled note.

This exhibition features a selection of photographs from the extensive series, Sutigi – a nous la nuit. Diabaté portrays people posing playfully for the camera, proudly showing off in trendy clothes and accessories worn with natural grace. In this respect, the settings in The Night Belongs to Us (a nous la nuit) are not unlike the contexts documented by the now internationally-famed Malian photographer Malick Sidibé some four decades earlier, which are shown simultaneously with Fatoumata Diabaté this autumn. The mood in photos by Diabaté’s contemporaries, however, is more urban and slightly restless, conveying a different zeitgeist than the perhaps more carefree ambiance found in Sidibé’s classic, balanced compositions.

There are many stories and perspectives from West Africa that remain to be told, to follow up what Malick Sidibé and other early photographers from Mali focused on in the 1950s when the colonial powers withdrew from the country. One of Diabaté’s incentives is to continue portraying life from her own perspective, in a region that is usually interpreted and described by observers and reporters from the outside.

The Night Belongs to Us (a nous la nuit) was produced in association with exp, experiments in crosscultural practices

Fatoumata Diabaté (b. 1980) is a photographer born in Bamako, Mali, where she currently lives and works. She studied at the Centre de Formation en Photographie (CFP) in Mali, and now works simultaneously on assignments for arts institutions, major organisations such as World Press Photo, and on her own serial photographic projects that develop over longer periods of time. She has been featured in numerous exhibitions and festivals of photography in Africa and Europe. In 2005, she was awarded the “Afrique en création” prize by the French cultural institute AFAA for her photo series Touaregs, en gestes et en mouvements. In 2011 she won the Fondation Blachère award for her photo series L’homme en Animal.

Fatoumata Diabaté, Sutigi – a nous la nuit

2012

Marabouparken har glädjen att presentera en retrospektiv utställning med konst & designgruppen Uglycute. Gruppens fyra medlemmar; Markus Degerman (konstnär), Andreas Nobel (inredningsarkitekt), Jonas Nobel (konstnär) och Fredrik Stenberg (arkitekt), inledde sitt samarbete under namnet Uglycute 1999 som en direkt reaktion på det debattklimat som då var rådande inom svensk design. Gruppen blev en del av en generation av formgivare och konstnärer som använde design och konsthantverk för att diskutera smak, kvalitet, klass, genus och samhället i stort. Med tiden utvecklade sig Uglycutes praktik till en verkligt genreöverskridande hybrid. I kraft av sina medlemmars olika professioner kom gruppens verksamhet att innehålla lika delar teori, praktik och pedagogik och har vid det här laget förgrenat sig in i den svenska och internationella konst- och designvärlden genom objekt, utställningsarkitektur, inredningar och undervisning som etiketteras beroende på beställare.

Enligt Uglycute själva utspelar sig deras praktik mellan konst, design och arkitektur. Målsättningen är att expandera begreppet design genom att korsbefrukta det med gruppens olika professioner och genom att analysera dess inverkan på samhället inte bara genom att utöva utan också genom att skriva, undervisa och organisera workshops. I Uglycutes sökande efter nya förhållningssätt till material, skönhet, ekonomi och samarbete uppstod den speciella fulsnygga ”look” med möbler, objekt och inredningar tillverkade i spånskiva, nålfilt, frigolit och lera. Utställningen i Marabouparkens 500 m2 stora galleri kommer att presenteras i en labyrint av transparenta metallnätburar, lika mycket en skulptur som utställningsarkitektur. Publiken kommer att kunna vandra runt i denna labyrintskulptur som bildar ett tredimensionellt arkiv över Uglycutes metoder sedda genom objekt, möbler, inredningar, filmer och pedagogiska grepp.

Sin speciella särart och inflytande som grupp har Uglycute skaffat sig tack vare sin rörelse mellan design- och konstområdena. Positionsförflyttningar har skapat både missförstånd och belyst hemmablindhet och ömsesidig okunnighet i bägge läger. Även om målet varit en förnyelse av designen så har mycket av arbetet och diskussionen varit förlagd till konstvärlden. Varför det? Jo, därför att konstvärlden erbjuder platser och utrymme för kritik och självreflektion och är en av de mest sofistikerade kontexterna att diskutera form i. Genom att ge Uglycute sin största separatutställning, sedan debuten på galleri Agata i Stockholm 2000, aktualiserar vi den roll som konstrummet spelar för en så viktig politisk och samhällelig debatt som formdebatten.

Som exempel på de sammanhang som Uglycute figurerat i kan nämnas: inredning till Cheap Monday huvudkontor 2010, Härmapan, scenografi till koreografen Anna Källblad, Moderna Dansteatern, Stockholm 2008, Dreamlands Burn, Mücsarnok Budapest 2006 (utställningsarkitektur till samlingsutställning med svensk samtidskonst), Konceptdesign, designutställning Nationalmuseum, Stockholm 2005, Sonic House på samlingsutställningen Utopia Station, Venendigbiennalen 2003, Stilen förde oss hit, designutställning, Röhsska muséet, Göteborg 2002, inredning till Magasin 3 Projekt Djurgårdsbrunn, Stockholm 2002, lounge för Moderna Museet, Stockholm 2000.

Den 15 oktober 2011 deltog en tapper skara i en planteringsworkshop med konstnären Andreas Gedin. En 40 meter lång text planterades med pärlhyacintlökar på Marabouparkens stora gräsmatta. Det var titeln till den berömda folksången WHERE HAVE ALL THE FLOWERS GONE?

Lördagen den 12 maj stod lökarna i full blom och Marabouparken bjöd in till vernissage med musik, barnaktiviteter och firande av våren! Som tilltugg serverades specialkomponerade smörgåsar med vallmofrön. Tanken var att dessa frön kunde resa genom matsmältningskanalen, ut i reningsverken och så småningom ge upphov till nya blommor!

PROGRAM: lördag 12 maj

Kl 12: Vernissage för Hilding Linnqvist Sommar, sommar öppnar
Kl 12–15: Konsumentföreningen Stockholm arrangerar planteringsworkshop för barn
Kl 13: Introduktion till utställningen Hilding Linnqvist, Sommar, sommar
Kl 14: Invigning av verket Where Have All the Flowers Gone? med konstnären Andreas Gedin i parken.

Varmt välkomna!

Lotta Antonsson
Yngve Baum
Stina Brockman

Three Photographers. Three Trends is a historical exhibition and publication that spans several decades and reflects the shift within photography that began in the 1960s. From having been a predominantly documentary practice the medium developed towards a more autonomous artistic approach before cementing its place within the contemporary art scene. The exhibition is a presentation of three major Swedish photographers from different generations: Yngve Baum (b. 1945), Stina Brockman (b. 1951) and Lotta Antonsson (b. 1963), and aims at highlighting the overall trends in their individual work as well as their relationship to one another.

All three photographers are clearly marked by the contemporary context of the era in which they entered the scene, but that influence was mutual and their work also contributed to the formation of the larger movements that developed both in dialogue and confrontation with various parties. An important idea behind the exhibition is to allow for a juxtaposition between different perspectives and readings. What can, in one respect be described as a thematic group exhibition, can also be seen as individual presentations of three different artists. In each case, the work shown ranges from early breakthrough pieces to completely new images. Some of which are being shown here for the very first time. The selection reflects the changes that have taken place over time, as well as the continuity that characterises each artists’ work. This enables both direct comparison between the works, and the more general trends that these three photographers can be said to represent.

Curated by Niclas Östlind, Three Photographers. Three Trends is part of his extensive research project Performing History. It contains a series of exhibitions and publications created in collaboration with eight institutions. Marabouparken art gallery is delighted to be a part of this significant project that not only reflects an eventful period in the recent history of photography but also contributes to the formulation of crucial issues in photography today.

Pawel Althamer
Kerstin Bergendal
Catti Brandelius
Anna Högberg & Johan Tirén
Kateřina Šedá
Anna Witt

The word hembyggd (home made) can express initiative, creative joy and authenticity. Hembygd (homeland) on the other hand refers to the area that surrounds one’s home and the environment and the people we come from, identify ourselves with and are formed by. In the exhibition title the words are combined into Hembyg(g)d, in an attempt to pinpoint the element of home- madeness that a hembygd often is and our possibility to participate in and contribute to the physical and social environment in which we live and work. The exhibition Hembyg(g)d presents seven artists whose works create connections between human relations, the physical environment and society at large, by examining, discussing, documenting and forming the environments and contexts in which we live.

A central work in the exhibition is artist Kerstin Bergendal’s presentation of the Sundbyberg-based art project PARK LEK. For some eight months Bergendal has explored Hallonbergen and Ör on foot, equipped with her backpack and her video camera. By talking to residents, local actors, civil servants, building contractors and politicians, she has gradually built up a unique urban development project – PARK LEK. The discussions have resulted in approximately 45 short films that together constitute the artist’s portrait of both districts. The films will be screened in the exhibition in a specially – designed living room furnished with objects borrowed from the residents. The films will also be available on the project’s homepage www.parklek.com. In addition, a model with a proposal for the reorganisation of Hallonbergen and Ör that the 146 participants in PARK LEK have worked on will be displayed.

Polish artist Pawel Althamer’s work stems from a desire to make common cause with his neighbours in pursuit of the metaphysical side of life. In the project Common Task, Althamer and his neighbours from Bròdno outside Warsaw travel around in gold space suits in an attempt to observe their own and others’ lives through the eyes of aliens. Since 2010 the Czech artist Kateřina Šedá has collaborated with the residents of the small Czech village of Nošovice whose character and community has been destroyed by the gigantic Hyundai factory that opened in the middle of the village. In her installation That’s the Way the Cookie Crumbles, which includes tables and tablecloths, she shows how she and the villagers paint and embroider a new identity around the perimeter of the factory that their village has been reduced to.

The German artist Anna Witt turns the so-called “privilege to formulate the problem” on its head in her Battle Rap. She invited a number of ethnologists from Munich who research “ghetto language” and “gangster rap” to present their reports in a “rap battle” with the rappers who were the subject of the research. The Stockholm housing estate Bredäng with its residential blocks, underground station, footpaths and football pitch is often the location in artist and musician Catti Brandelius’ films. It is also here that her most famous artist alias, “Miss Universe”, spends her days being waited on by her many slaves. In her latest film we encounter a woman, who, by reacting to her own fear, is transformed into Förortsindianen (the Estate Indian) – the protector of the female residents of Bredäng.

Sometimes artistic work occurs on an abstract level, as in the earlier work of Anna Högberg and Johan Tirén where they collaborated with civil servants at the office of Regional Growth, Environment and Planning in order to try to find new approaches for strategic and visionary planning for the development of the Stockholm region for the next 30 years. For the Hembyg(g)d exhibition they have created an outlook tower with the ambiguous title Point of View. As a sculpture it embodies an important aspect of several of the participating artists’ work; the ability of art to put into perspective peoples’ position in the social structure.

The exhibition Hembyg(g)d is co-produced by Marabouparken konsthall and PARK LEK with support from the Municipality of Sundbyberg, Fastighets AB Förvaltaren and the Czech Centre Stockholm. The exhibition is curated by Helena Selder of Marabouparken. The PARK LEK project has received additional support from the National Public Art Council’s research assignment, “Samverkan om gestaltning av offentliga miljöer” (Collaboration on the Creation of Public Environments) in collaboration with the Swedish National Heritage Board, the Swedish National Board of Housing, Building and Planning and the Swedish Museum of Architecture.

2011

A suite of screenprints from 2006 are based on letters that a young Morrissey, himself an obsessive fan and at the time an aspiring music writer, wrote to the London music weeklies in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. Collins brings back to light a selection of these passionate and sharp-tongued contributions, which only rarely made it into the reviews proper. These works expand on one of the central aspects of the world won’t listen, namely the issue of fandom and cultural fascination.

Phil Collins, the world won't listen, 2004-7, photo: Jean-Baptiste Béranger
Phil Collins, the world won't listen, 2004-7, Courtesy Shady Lane Productions.
Phil Collins, the world won't listen, 2004-7, Courtesy Shady Lane Productions.

In the exhibition at Marabouparken, Phil Collins presents his acclaimed three-part video installation the world won’t listen. Filmed in Colombia, Turkey and Indonesia, the trilogy features fans of the influential indie-rock band The Smiths performing karaoke versions of tracks from their 1987 compilation album of the same name. Collins first began work on the world won’t listen in 2004 in Bogotá, where he re-recorded the album note for note with local musicians and created a fully functioning karaoke machine. The second part took place in Istanbul in 2005 and was included in the 9th International Istanbul Biennial. The final part was filmed in 2007 in Jakarta and Bandung, the hotbeds of a flowering Indonesian rock-scene. Out of hundreds of takes from each country, Collins re-assembled the world won’t listen in its original running order, thus creating a collection of ‘video-albums.’ A tender, humorous, and occasionally heartbreaking portrait of humanity, the work is a study on the mediation and strength of popular culture’s global reach. the world won’t listen is in many ways representative of the collaborative and participatory situations with which Collins’ art is frequently associated. At the same time, it exemplifies the central dichotomy that lies at the heart of his diverse practice, between the emotional core of lens-based media and their ultimate potential for manipulation.   

Phil Collins, SOUNDS, August 12, 1978 (2006), SOUNDS October 27, 1979 (2006), RECORD MIRROR, March 29, 1980 (2006), photo: Jean-Baptiste Béranger.
Phil Collins, britney #3, 2001, Courtesy Shady Lane Productions.
Phil Collins, el mundo no escuchará, 2004, Courtesy Shady Lane Productions.

The photographic series britney comprises large-scale prints of defaced Britney Spears posters which Collins photographed in the New York subway in late 2001. Infusing these discarded and abject images, caught in an extreme close-up, with formal precision and a pseudo-monumental pathos, it is as if the artist is implying that the camera, the original agent of her spectacular degradation, might now be able to re-humanise the fallen star.

Phil Collins is born in 1970 in Runcorn, UK. At the moment he lives and works in Berlin.

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Ann Lislegaard has, since the beginning of the 1990s, developed an international artistic career centred on film, sound and light installations, whose mind-expanding characteristics are her special attributes. In the exhibition Haunted. Tapping of the Fox Sisters. at Marabouparken, we present a selection of her recent science fiction inspired works, which feel particularly urgent in a time when our political culture is characterised by fear and retrospection. The genre of science fiction is a broad current in popular culture whose power of attraction lies in its ability to make us break our habitual conceptions and reflect on our contemporary age with the help of imaginative alternative worlds, depictions of the future and spectacular “what if” scenarios. Few cultural expressions have, like science fiction, been able to make people ponder complex issues such as the relationship of dependence between past, present and future, sexuality and fear of the unknown. However, the science fiction aficionado is well aware that one does not visit the past with impunity, that alien creatures are just a facet of ourselves and that our contemporary gender roles will have the future laughing at our lack of sophistication.

During her entire career, Ann Lislegaard has used her body of work to undermine and redefine our perception, identity and relationship to private as well as public spaces. For her, the connection to iconic works of science fiction-, such as the novels Crystal World by J. G. Ballard, Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin and The Female Man by Joanna Russ and films such as 2001: A Space Odyssey by Stanley Kubrick and Close Encounters of the Third Kind by Steven Spielberg, is a way of extending references and making use of meaning carrying images and themes.

In the exhibition Haunted. Tapping of the Fox Sisters, sound, light and moving images lure us into a Lislegaardian universe in constant transformation in which our attitude to space, time, sexuality and the unknown is tested. 

Hilding Linnqvist, Dekorativ skiss, 1920. Foto:Leif Mattsson
Hilding Linnqvist, Sittande dam med slöja, 1910-tal. Foto: Leif Mattsson
Hilding Linnqvist, Den rosafärgade hatten, sent 1920-tal. Foto

I utställningen Hilding Linnqvists arkiv får vi se nya sidor hos en av 1900-talets mest omtyckta och mångsidiga konstnärer. Utställningens titel anspelar på den stora samling verk och föremål i Stiftelsen Hilding Linnqvists konst ägo som Marabouparken konsthall förvaltar. Ambitionen är att ge den stora och värdefulla samlingen av Hilding Linnqvists konst en större presentation. Hilding Linnqvist (1891-1984) var en av den svenska naivismens förgrundsgestalter på 1910-talet och en viktig inspiratör i kretsen kring galleriet Färg och Form i Stockholm. På 1970-talet tog konstkritikern Ulf Linde initiativ till att sortera Hilding Linnqvists teckningar i arkivskåp. Teckningsarkivet kompletterades vid konstnärens död med kvarlämnade verk och föremål och omfattar idag ca 1500 teckningar, 200 akvareller och 96 oljemålningar. Stiftelsen Hilding Linnqvists konsts samling har i utställningen kompletterats med inlånade målningar: bland annat den gåtfulla Barn på ängen (1920) Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Strandliv vid Adriatiska havet (1922) och Sommarnatt vid Riddarholmskanalen (1934) Stockholms Stadsmuseum, Stockholm och Sommarnatt (1924) i privat ägo. I utställningen visas dessutom den jättelika och sällan visade kartongen till Nubisk by (1965), samt skisser och föremål ur Hilding Linnqvists samling.

Utställningen är grovt indelad i fyra teman: folk, saker, platser och sagor. Dessa speglar arkivets tematiska organisation och ger en bild av Hilding Linnqvists bildskapande utifrån dess egna motivkretsar. Hilding Linnqvists teckningar intar en viktig plats i samlingen; från 1910- och 20-talens ögonblickbilder från kaféer och stadsliv till noggrant upplagda förlagor till större målningar och de blomstudier konstnären återkom till under hela sin långa karriär. På 1920-talet gjorde Hilding Linnqvist flera större, detaljerade målningar med motiv från resor i utlandet och Stockholmsvyer. Hilding Linnqvists dittills naivistiska detaljmåleri vek vid den här tiden successivt undan för mer noggrant planerade kompositioner i färg och form.

Hilding Linnqvist har en speciell koppling till Marabouparken. På 1930-talet gjorde konstnären en skiss till en stor väggmålning för Göteborgs stadsteater som aldrig uppfördes. När han 1938 fick en beställning att göra en väggmålning för Marabous personalmatsal i Sundbyberg återanvände han skissen. Innan arbetet började reste Hilding Linnqvist till Grekland. Vid återkomsten arbetade han in motiv från sin resa i Maraboufresken som kom att heta Komedi och idyll. Huvudmotivet behöll han dock och målningen skildrar därför den moderna och antika teaterns födelse i form av ett Commedia dell´arte – sällskap som slagit sig ned i ruinerna efter en amfiteater. Väggmålningen sitter fortfarande kvar i samma lokaler som numera är omvandlade till kontor.

Om Hilding Linnqvist
Hilding Linnqvist föddes i Stockholm 1891 och studerade vid Tekniska skolan (1908-10) och Konstakademin (1910-12). 1912 ledde han ett uttåg från Konstakademin i protest mot föråldrade undervisningsmetoder. I sina tidiga målningar framhöll och eftersträvade han det ”naiva”, inspirerad både av självlärda ”hötorgsmålare” och Carl Fredrik Hills och Ernst Josephsons målningar från sjukdomstiden. Sagomotiv varvades med motiv från försvinnande miljöer i Stockholms utkanter och stämningsmättade, gåtfulla målningar. Vid 1940-talets början var Hilding Linnqvist en etablerad och uppburen konstnär, professor vid Konstakademien 1939-1941 och 1940 föremål för en stor utställning där. I slutet av 1940-talet utgavs en serie föreläsningar av Hilding Linnqvist i boken Tankar om konst. Hilding Linnqvist arbetade in i det sista och dog 1984, 94 år gammal.

Katalog
I samband med utställningen ger Marabouparken ut en katalog med nytt bildmaterial och nyskrivna texter av Johan Börjesson och Olle Granath samt Ulf Lindes klassiska text Inför motiven från Moderna Museets katalog 1986.

1970 blev den amerikanska författaren, konstnären och aktivisten Kate Millett världskänd med boken ”Sexual Politics”, där begreppet ’patriarkat’ för första gången användes som ett analytiskt verktyg inom den feministiska debatten. Kate Millett skrev ytterligare sju böcker, om bl. a. prostitution, politisk tortyr och kvinnors rättigheter i Iran och kom att bli en av feminismens främsta företrädare.

Efter en längre tid av brevväxling och telefonsamtal med den nu 77-åriga Kate Millett mottog konstnärerna Mikaela och Moa Krestesen (Sisters of Jam) en inbjudan att komma till den legendariska Kate Millett Farm – an art colony for women, i Poughkeepsie, NY. Farmen grundades 1979 och var aktiv fram till för några år sedan. Kvinnliga konstnärer och författare inbjöds att bo och arbeta här, och Kate Millett hoppades på så sätt skapa forum för kreativa samarbeten och möjligheter att utforska en kollektiv samhällsordning helt på kvinnors villkor.

Idag lever Kate Millett ensam och kvar finns bara spår av kollektivet. Mikaela och Moa Krestesen tillbringade en tid på farmen i oktober 2010 och vistelsen dokumenterades med video, ljud och stillbilder. Materialet speglar Kate Milletts liv samtidigt som det reflekterar USA:s historia och berör frågor som historieskrivning och vem som tillåts få bli hjälte. Vad hände med 1960- och 70-talens politiska ideal och den tidens tankar kring gemenskap och solidaritet? Vilka förväntningar och föreställningar har vi kring upplevelsen av det kollektiva idag? Utställningen Kate Millett Farm visas parallellt med ett porträtt av en svensk 1900-tals kultur-personlighet, Hilding Linnqvist, och inbjuder därför kring diskussioner om 1900-talets olika idéströmningar, porträtterandets dynamik, och kanonbildning.

Kate Millett Farm är den första delen i ett pågående projekt där Sisters of Jam bjuder in olika aktörer och institutioner till att genom en kollektiv process bygga på porträttet av Kate Millett. Till Marabouparken har S.O.J bjudit in artisten Jenny Wilson och dokumentärmakaren Fredrik Redelius att tillsammans med konstnärerna skapa en rumslig gestaltning som innefattar rörlig bild, stillbilder, musik, ljud och objekt. Genom dessa och framtida samarbeten hoppas S.O.J kunna lösa upp gränser mellan olika genrer och även öppna upp för ett samtal mellan generationer, historier och samtider.

Artisten Jenny Wilson har skrivit fyra kokande apokalyptiska låtar som tematiskt springer ur Kate Milletts tankegångar. Titlarna för tankarna till demonstrationstågens plakat; “FREEDOM”, “POLITICS”, “EVOLUTION”, “BIOLOGY”. Musiken kommer att kunna köpas på kassettband i en mycket limiterad upplaga i Marabouparkens shop.

S.O.J – Sisters of Jam är namnet på ett samarbete som existerar parallellt med Mikaela Krestesens och Moa Krestesens individuella konstnärskap, där båda arbetar med porträttet i vidare bemärkelse. Samarbetet kring Kate Millett farm tog form under en ateljévistelse på Iaspis 2010. S.O.J. är även avsändare till det offentliga verket Nobody puts Baby in a corner i Umeå, som har kommit att bli ett landmärke för Umeå stadskärna.

Konstnärerna vill tacka:
Konstnärsnämnden
Lilla Galleriet, Ramverkstan, Umeå

2010

Dave Allen, Kerstin Bergendal, Martin Boyce, Nathan Coley, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Martin Karlsson, Matts Leiderstam, Margaret Morton, Paola Pivi, Ingo Vetter, Annette Weisser, Elisabeth Westerlund, Kohei Yoshiyuki, Christine Ödlund

Med invigningsutställningen Parkliv vill vi aktivera den parkkontext som Marabouparkens nya konsthall bokstavligt talat är försänkt i. Som utställningens titel antyder har vi bjudit in konstnärer som intresserar sig för vad som utspelar sig i parken och hur vi förhåller oss till den som natur, kultur och fysiskt rum. Dessa olika aspekter av parkrummet går in i varandra och återkommer i utställningen på olika plan: på molekylär växtnivå, i naturens och kulturens ständiga växelverkan och i parkens sätt att skapa plats i offentligheten för möten och lek – en slags grundläggande mänsklighet. I samband med utställningen publicerar vi en katalog med texter av idéhistorikern Ronny Ambjörnsson, arkitekten och forskaren Katja Grillner och utställningens två kuratorer Bettina Pehrsson och Helena Selder.

Som offentligt rum ger parken uttryck åt ett mänskligt behov att odla och forma naturen efter egna önskemål. Odla gör man inte bara för att överleva – odlandet är också ett uttryck för en social, vårdande instinkt med potential att förändra människor, platser och relationer. I konstnärens Nathan Coleys stora ljusskylt WE MUST CULTIVATE OUR GARDEN har det berömda slutet på Voltaires upplysningsroman Candide upphöjts till ett moraliskt imperativ där ett med versaler uppfordrande ”VI” betonar en gemensam ansträngning. Detta ”VI” har pensionerade ingenjören Lee Burns gjort till sin livsuppgift. I Ingo Vetters och Annette Weissers film I Am Farming Humanity får vi följa Burns berättelse om sin personliga resa från bomullsfältet i Mississippideltat till den gård på Detroits Lower East Side där han ”bygger mänsklighet” och skapar gemenskap genom sina odlingar som hela grannskapet ges fri tillgång till. Detta seglivade behov hos människan att skapa sig en egen oas gör sig påmint under de mest ogynnsamma förhållanden. Margaret Morton skildrar med sina fotografier tillfälliga trädgårdar skapade av hemlösa på övergivna tomter på Manhattan i New York. Trots eländet i de hemlösas situation finner fotografen uppfinningsrikedom, skönhet och lugn.

Kopplingen mellan museet – platsen där idéer om landskap förmedlas av konstnärer – och landskapet självt är ett viktigt tema för Matts Leiderstam. Med sitt för Parklivsutställningen specialtillverkade Periskop (Marabouparken), kan besökarna stå på golvet nere i den underjordiska konsthallen och kika ut bland trädkronorna. Matts Leiderstam fäster vår blick på kopplingen mellan utställningsrummet och parklandskapet utanför – ett samband med potential att prägla inte enbart invigningsutställningen utan institutionen som helhet. I naturen utanför konsthallen pågår kampen ständigt fastän vi varken ser eller hör det med våra trubbiga, mänskliga sinnen. Genom verket Växternas kemiska språk har Christine Ödlund under en längre tid följt en forskargrupp på KTH som genom att registrera växternas kemiska reaktioner på olika stimuli försöker knäcka källkoden till hur växter kommunicerar. Christine Ödlund gestaltar i sitt verk de uppmätta resultaten i ett mångbottnat verk bestående av en skulptural pilskottsinstallation och partituren till två ljudverk: Stress Call of The Stinging Nettle och Plant Drummer.

Parkliv, Marabouparken
Parkliv, Marabouparken

Marabouparken beskrivs ofta som en ”funkispark” där det funktionalistiska tänkandet är tydligast artikulerat i den stora gräsmattan som är avsedd som en social yta att disponeras fritt för promenad, lek, picknick och vila. Paola Pivis (Untitled) Slope är en konstruerad grässlänt med perfekt ”rull”. Denna gigantiska grässkulptur ger en mångbottnad och lekfull kommentar till trädgården och parkens främsta fetisch – gräsmattan. Som ett sätt att påminna oss om den roll barnens lek spelat i formandet av Marabouparken och andra parker har konstnären Kerstin Bergendal med sitt konstnärliga forskningsprojekt Park Lek lånat lekprincipen från Parkleken – en barnkulturell institution ungefär jämngammal med Marabouparken. I Marabouparkens lokaler har konstnären inrett ett eget fysiskt och mentalt rum där hon bjuder in olika personer till diskussion och lek med parkens idé utan förutbestämt mål. Rummet som under arbetets gång fyllts med teckningar, foton, och modeller flyttar tillfälligt in i Parklivsutställningen för att sedan flytta upp till ett av konsthallens projektrum där processen får sin fortsättning.

Christine Ödlund, Stress Call of the Stinging Nettle, 2008. Foto: Jean Baptiste Béranger
Parkliv, Marabouparken. Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Parc Central, video 2003–2006. Utställningsfoto: Jean-Baptiste Béranger
Martin Karlsson, Utan titel (hjortdjur), 2010
Parkliv, Marabouparken
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Ann Lislegaard has, since the beginning of the 1990s, developed an international artistic career centred on film, sound and light installations, whose mind-expanding characteristics are her special attributes. In the exhibition Haunted. Tapping of the Fox Sisters. at Marabouparken, we present a selection of her recent science fiction inspired works, which feel particularly urgent in a time when our political culture is characterised by fear and retrospection. The genre of science fiction is a broad current in popular culture whose power of attraction lies in its ability to make us break our habitual conceptions and reflect on our contemporary age with the help of imaginative alternative worlds, depictions of the future and spectacular “what if” scenarios. Few cultural expressions have, like science fiction, been able to make people ponder complex issues such as the relationship of dependence between past, present and future, sexuality and fear of the unknown. However, the science fiction aficionado is well aware that one does not visit the past with impunity, that alien creatures are just a facet of ourselves and that our contemporary gender roles will have the future laughing at our lack of sophistication.

During her entire career, Ann Lislegaard has used her body of work to undermine and redefine our perception, identity and relationship to private as well as public spaces. For her, the connection to iconic works of science fiction-, such as the novels Crystal World by J. G. Ballard, Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin and The Female Man by Joanna Russ and films such as 2001: A Space Odyssey by Stanley Kubrick and Close Encounters of the Third Kind by Steven Spielberg, is a way of extending references and making use of meaning carrying images and themes.

In the exhibition Haunted. Tapping of the Fox Sisters, sound, light and moving images lure us into a Lislegaardian universe in constant transformation in which our attitude to space, time, sexuality and the unknown is tested. 

Med anledning av att det har gått 20 år sedan Berlinmuren föll visar vi en ny teckning av Dan Perjovschi varje måndag under sju veckor mellan 9 november och 21 december. Perioden löper från den dag muren revs i Berlin av en upprörd folkmassa till den dag då Ceausescu misslyckades med att lugna den likaledes upprörda folkmassan som samlats framför partihögvarteret i centrala Bukarest. Det var början på Ceausescus snabba fall. (Obs! Förlängt till 21 februari)

Dan Perjovschi, Then/Now, 2009

Onlinepresentationen av Dan Perjovschis politiska och ofta satiriska teckningar ingår i utställningen Från det ena till det andra som pågår på Rumänska kulturinstitutet i Stockholm t o m 19 februari 2010. I ett samarbete mellan Rumänska kulturinstitutetIndex – The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation,MarabouparkenBildmuseetGävle KonstcentrumMalmö KonstmuseumSignaloch Norrköpings Konstmuseum publiceras hans teckningar samtidigt på alla institutioners hemisdor. Medverkande konstnärer i Från det ena till det andra ärMarie-Louise Ekman (Stockholm), Harun Farocki/Andrei Ujică (Berlin), Anja Kirschner (Berlin/London), David Maljkovic (Berlin/Rijeka), Ciprian Mureşan(Cluj), Dan Perjovschi (Bukarest), Viktor Rosdahl (Malmö), Stealth(Belgrad/Rotterdam), Judi Werthein (Buenos Aires/New York), Åbäke(Stockholm/London). Curator: Maria Lind.
Läs mer om utställningen här.

Dan Perjovschi, Then/Now, 2009

Dan Perjovschi har en lång historia som tecknare med verk i massmedia. Sedan 1991 publicerar han regelbundet dagsaktuella teckningar i den Bukarestbaserade tidskriften 22. Under utställningen Manifesta 2 i Luxemburg 1998 följde han samma modell och publicerade nya teckningar i dagstidningen Tageblatt och veckotidningen d’Letzebuerger Land. Han hängde paralellt upp tidningsidorna med den färska teckningen i Casino Luxemburg, den lokala konsthallen. Med enkla medel gör han knivskarpa kommenterar till omfattande politiska, ekonomiska och konstrelaterade ämnen. På så sätt levererar han en bild baserad på den värld han bevittnar men också på hur den förmedlas via mediernas nyhetsflöde. Ibland återförs bilden till de media som förser honom med nyheter, andra gånger tecknar han på väggar i t ex konstmuseer. Han har också arbetat med animation, graffiti och art brut.

 

2009

Johanna Adebäck, Line Anda Dalmar, Eva Arnqvist, chanceprojects (konstnärerna Marysia Lewandowska och Neil Cummings) & 51% Studios (arkitekterna Peter Thomas och Catherine du Toit), Thomas Elovsson, Joakim Forsgren, Olof Glemme, Per Hasselberg, Francois Hers & Jérôme Poggi, Janna Holmstedt & Anna Högberg, John Huntington, Maria Lindberg, Noak Lönn, Maria Pruska & Joanna Warsza, Per Sandén & Jörgen Svensson, Johan Tirén, Johan Waerndt & Monika Marklinger.

Det internationella symposiet Open Engagement genomförs 25, 26 och 28 september. I den kvarlämnade symposiescenografin Art in Public Space is Never a Total Success, but it is Never a Total Failure Either, signerad konstnären Thomas Elovsson, görs nu symposiet tillgängligt av en utställning bestående av filmer och material relaterade till de föreläsningar och konstverk som presenteras inom ramen för Open Engagement.

En av symposiets huvudfrågor handlar om beställarens och uppdragets påverkan på den konstnärliga processen. Hur formulerar man ett uppdrag så att konstnären har goda möjligheter att åstadkomma något intressant för sig själv, sina uppdragsgivare och sin publik? Och vad innebär det egentligen att arbeta situations- eller platsspecifikt? Som arrangörer av ett symposium om beställarrollen, har själva initierat tre beställningsprojekt. Studenterna på Konstfacks Art in the Public Realm har i dialog med landskapsarkitekterna NOD (Naturorienterad Design) kommit med idéer för ett industriområde i omvandling i Sundbyberg. En annan beställning är ett porträtt av platsen Sundbyberg av konstnären och Sundbybergsbon Olof Glemme. Det sk Open Engagement: Commissions, ett öppet formulerat uppdrag där konstnärerna Eva Arnqvist, Thomas Elovsson, Per Hasselberg och Maria Lindberg bjöds in att producera verk i relation till symposiets kontext och innehåll.

Under symposiet berättar konstnärerna Anna Högberg och Johan Tirén om sitt samarbete med planerare på Regionplanekontoret i Stockholm, Marysia Lewandowska presenterar material från samarbetsprojektet Social Cinema i London och Joanna Warsza visar performanceverk hon inititierat i Warszawa – material från dessa projekt och mycket annat kommer att presenteras i utställningen.

Open Engagement är sammanställt av Kim Einarsson och Helena Selder.

Projektet Open Engagement görs i samarbete med Polska institutet, Konstfack och Sundbybergs stad, och kan genomföras tack vare stöd från Framtidens Kultur.

Utställning med årets P.A.N.K.-stipendiater Ebba Bohlin och Jakob Simonson

Här – inte här

Lokalen som Marabouparken för tillfället disponerar är en f d missionskyrka. Ebba Bohlin har nu i snart ett år haft ateljé i huset och gör nu en platsspecifik installation som både berör det faktiska rummet i utställningssalen och en annan kyrkobyggnad: Engelsbrektskyrkan.

I Ebba Bohlins konstnärliga verksamhet återkommer en fascination för materialitet och ett självbiografiskt utforskande av existentiella frågor. Utgångspunkten är ofta rumslighet både i natur och arkitektur, men tonvikten läggs på ett poetiskt, abstrakt plan.

Ebba Bohlin har under det senaste året ställt ut på Nordin Gallery (Vändningen), Bonniers Konsthall (Rumstering) samt i Norge och Litauen. Hon har nyligen tilldelats arbetsstipendium från Konstnärsnämnden och arbetar med ett projekt för Statens Konstråd inför 2011. 2008 tog hon magisterexamen från Konstfack.

Untitled (Projection)

I Jakob Simonsons Untitled (Projection) (2008) projiceras figurer på och genom en projektionsduk. Duken är uppspänd på en ram och står fritt i rummet så att betraktaren kan se “bakom” bildytan. Från ena hållet framstår det som om någon rör sig bakom ytan. Från en annan vinkel blir det tydligt att det är just en bild. Torrt och enkelt, med en avskalad mystik som bottnar i det upplevda mötet med en mänsklig gestalt, avtäcks den process genom vilken vi ständigt förhandlar med oss själva i mötet med en målning eller en bild: “Detta är en bild, detta är inte verklighet” samtidigt som vi tjusas av illusionen.

Jakob Simonsons arbete gestaltar sig ofta som installationer och skulpturer med tydliga inslag av måleri. Simonson intresserar sig för måleriet som fysisk yta/bildrum å ena sidan och som struktur i det fysiska rummet/landskapet å den andra.

Simonson har under det senaste året ställt ut på bl a Malmö Konsthall, Landskrona Konsthall, Galleri Arnstedt, 0047 i Oslo, Kunsthal Charlottenborg i Köpenhamn och Pavilhão 28 i Lissabon. 2008 tog han magisterexamen från Konsthögskolan i Malmö.

P.A.N.K.
P.A.N.K.-stipendiet har sedan 2005 gett 18 nyutexaminerade konstnärer tillgång till ateljéer hos Marabouparken och skissuppdrag åt Fastighets AB Förvaltaren. Av förslagen har 11 hittills genomförts. Ebba Bohlins och Jakob Simonsons projekt för P.A.N.K. är fortfarande i skisskedet. I samband med att verksamheten flyttar in i den nya konsthallen i Marabouparken kommer P.A.N.K.-stipendiet som sådant att upphöra men arbetet med produktionsplatser för offentlig konst kommer att fortsätta.

Med anledning av att det har gått 20 år sedan Berlinmuren föll visar vi en ny teckning av Dan Perjovschi varje måndag under sju veckor mellan 9 november och 21 december. Perioden löper från den dag muren revs i Berlin av en upprörd folkmassa till den dag då Ceausescu misslyckades med att lugna den likaledes upprörda folkmassan som samlats framför partihögvarteret i centrala Bukarest. Det var början på Ceausescus snabba fall. (Obs! Förlängt till 21 februari)

Dan Perjovschi, Then/Now, 2009

Onlinepresentationen av Dan Perjovschis politiska och ofta satiriska teckningar ingår i utställningen Från det ena till det andra som pågår på Rumänska kulturinstitutet i Stockholm t o m 19 februari 2010. I ett samarbete mellan Rumänska kulturinstitutetIndex – The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation,MarabouparkenBildmuseetGävle KonstcentrumMalmö KonstmuseumSignaloch Norrköpings Konstmuseum publiceras hans teckningar samtidigt på alla institutioners hemisdor. Medverkande konstnärer i Från det ena till det andra ärMarie-Louise Ekman (Stockholm), Harun Farocki/Andrei Ujică (Berlin), Anja Kirschner (Berlin/London), David Maljkovic (Berlin/Rijeka), Ciprian Mureşan(Cluj), Dan Perjovschi (Bukarest), Viktor Rosdahl (Malmö), Stealth(Belgrad/Rotterdam), Judi Werthein (Buenos Aires/New York), Åbäke(Stockholm/London). Curator: Maria Lind.
Läs mer om utställningen här.

Dan Perjovschi, Then/Now, 2009

Dan Perjovschi har en lång historia som tecknare med verk i massmedia. Sedan 1991 publicerar han regelbundet dagsaktuella teckningar i den Bukarestbaserade tidskriften 22. Under utställningen Manifesta 2 i Luxemburg 1998 följde han samma modell och publicerade nya teckningar i dagstidningen Tageblatt och veckotidningen d’Letzebuerger Land. Han hängde paralellt upp tidningsidorna med den färska teckningen i Casino Luxemburg, den lokala konsthallen. Med enkla medel gör han knivskarpa kommenterar till omfattande politiska, ekonomiska och konstrelaterade ämnen. På så sätt levererar han en bild baserad på den värld han bevittnar men också på hur den förmedlas via mediernas nyhetsflöde. Ibland återförs bilden till de media som förser honom med nyheter, andra gånger tecknar han på väggar i t ex konstmuseer. Han har också arbetat med animation, graffiti och art brut.

 

2008

A beautiful young woman leans over the soup bowl of her neighbour and spits into it. She is performing the instruction work Spit in someone’s Soup, Instructions on how to be politically Incorrect (2003) by the Austrian artist Erwin Wurm. The work is part of a series of instructions on how to be politically incorrect. Spit in Someone’s Soup is also the name of a travelling exhibition of Erwin Wurm’s work produced by Riksutställningar [Swedish Travelling Exhibitions] in collaboration with Marabou Park. This is the Swedish audience’s first opportunity to acquaint itself with the work of Erwin Wurm – one of todays most interesting sculptors.

Born in 1954 in Austria, Erwin Wurm lives and works in Vienna and is one of his country’s most successful contemporary artists. A conceptual sculptor, he considers all his works to be sculptures whether they are produced as photographs, videos, drawings or texts. The exhibition will show a unique selection of Erwin Wurm’s work from his early garment sculptures to his latest instruction pieces.

Throughout his career, Erwin Wurm has questioned the nature and potential of sculpture. The exhibition demonstrates how he deals with the classical sculptural problems of volume, proportion and movement. To these, he adds new questions such as: How long is something an object? and At what point does it turn into performance? In the exploration of the boundaries between these concepts, Wurm develops his own time and performance based sculpture. Best known is his own sculpture genre, the One Minute Sculptures, which redefines the concept of sculpture from a static object into a dynamic “action”.

Open Your Trousers – Put Flowers In Them And Don’t Think, or Hold Your Breath And Think Of Spinoza are examples of the slightly absurd instructions issued by Erwin Wurm as he invites us to realise one of his One Minute Sculptures. The audience is asked to use attributes such as flowers, balls or bottles to participate in the realisation of a “sculpture”. Erwin Wurm also exhibits photographic documentation of previously staged One Minute Sculptures, where the surroundings play an important part. Erwin Wurm illustrates complex relations by using bizarre humour; a prime example being his latest photographic series Don’t Trust Your Curator (2006) which deals with the power relations in the art world.

Artist’s Talk with Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen September 25, 5 pm.
Opening September 25, 6-8 pm. The ladies choir The Sweaptaways inaugurates the exhibition at 6 pm.

About the Complaints Choirs…
From a conversation between the Finnish artists, Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen and Tellervo Kalleinen, sprang the ingenious idea of literally creating a complaints choir. In Finnish the expression “valituskuoro” denotes a mass of people complaining simultaneously. The idea was to bring people together who feel the need to complain in a choir where they jointly can sing their complaints out aloud. Since the Complaints Choir project was first launched in Birmingham in 2005 approximately 20 complaints choirs have assembled all over the world – from Bodö, Norway to Melbourne Australia. The interest from prospective choirs has been so massive that the artists have had to put out a manual on their website www.complaintschoir.org in order to help people organise new choirs.

About The Complaints Choir of Sundbyberg…
Marabou Park is joining the worldwide complaints choir movement by creating a local complaints choir – The Complaints Choir of Sundbyberg. Do You feel the need for a more creative outlet of your everyday complaints? Join The Complaints Choir of Sundbyberg! It’s free and no previous experience of singing is required. The rehearsals commence in October with choir leader Sophie Eklöf. The Complaints Choir of Sundbyberg will premiere at the Marabou Park annex located in the former Church of Betlehem in Sundbyberg November 14th. For further information or to sign up for the complaints choir please contact us on ph: +468294590 or write to klaga@marabouparken.se

About the artists…
Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen (lives and works in Helsinki) and Tellervo Kalleinen (lives and works in Helsinki) have, along their individual practices, collaborated since 2003. Apart from the Complaints Choir project they’ve recently launched a project, “I Love My Job”, in Gothenburg where they invite people to make films about “nightmarish situations” that can occur in workplaces. Read more at www.mittjobb.org.

About the exhibition at Marabou Park annex…
At Marabou Park annex a video installation by Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen and Tellervo Kalleinen will be exhibited featuring complaints choirs from Birmingham (2005), Helsinki (2006), Hamburg (2006), St Petersburg (2006), Chicago (2007) and Singapore (2008). A uniting feature of the initiators of the choirs is the idea that they represent the whiniest nation of all and that people all over the world are united in the most common complaints; the weather and public transport. A general feeling of maltreatment surfaces in the recurrent chorus – “It’s not fair!” On top of that we can detect a unique local layer of what seems to be the collective unconscious of the different nations. Of course the Finnish are more annoyed with bad sauna etiquette than other people. Americans worry that their nation is beginning to resemble one big strip mall. Somebody in the Russian choir claims that he or she can paint the square of Malevitj while drunk! In terms of complaints the most dramatic mix of the severe and the banal are perhaps found in the Complaints Choir of Singapore. Whining about “bad hair days” due to humidity together with complaints about the repressive little city state “Where everything that isn’t expressively permitted is forbidden.” Consequently the Complaints Choir of Singapore was forbidden to perform the day before the concert.

Opening of the film with The Complaints Choir of Sundbyberg Thursday December 4, 5pm-8pm

The short film with The Complaints Choir of Sundbyberg is the last part of Marabou Park’s autumn with artists’ Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen and Tellervo Kalleinens Complaints Choirs project.

Vimeo
Youtube

About the Complaints Choirs…
From a conversation between the Finnish artists, Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen and Tellervo Kalleinen, sprang the ingenious idea of literally creating a complaints choir. In Finnish the expression “valituskuoro” denotes a mass of people complaining simultaneously. The idea was to bring people together who feel the need to complain in a choir where they jointly can sing their complaints out aloud. Since the Complaints Choir project was first launched in Birmingham in 2005 approximately 20 complaints choirs have assembled all over the world – from Bodö, Norway to Melbourne Australia. The interest from prospective choirs has been so massive that the artists have had to put out a manual on their website www.complaintschoir.org in order to help people organise new choirs. Marabou Park joins the worldwide movement and creates a local choir.

About the artists…
Oliver Kochta-Kalleinen (lives and works in Helsinki) and Tellervo Kalleinen (lives and works in Helsinki) have, along their individual practices, collaborated since 2003. Apart from the Complaints Choir project they’ve recently launched a project, “I Love My Job”, in Gothenburg where they invite people to make films about “nightmarish situations” that can occur in workplaces. Read more at www.mittjobb.org.

Åsa Norberg, Fredrik Norén, Jesper Nyrén, Jennie Sundén

The P.A.N.K. grant is part of a residency programme focusing on public art. At most five newly graduated artists per year are invited to reside in Sundbyberg and work with new works for public space in Sundbyberg. The programme is a collaboration between Marabou Park and Förvaltaren the local Housing Company.

Jesper Nyréns konstnärskap kretsar kring måleriets fysiska och språkliga möjligheter. Med ett bildspråk som visar på influenser både från konstruktivismen och minimalismen utforskar han måleriets olika formella aspekter och strävar efter att nå en punkt där verken balanserar mellan objekt och bild. Målningarna är lika mycket konstruktioner för att iscensätta måleriska  problem och utmaningar som för att gestalta erfarenheter och idéer.

Jesper Nyrén är född 1979 i Sala och gick ut Kungliga Konsthögskolan 2007. Han har under senaste året deltagit i flera utställningar, bl.a. på. Galleri Bastard och Galleri Flach+Thulin i Stockholm. www.jespernyren.com

Åsa Norberg arbetar ofta med en arkitekturrelaterad tematik och bildvärld. Hon intresserar sig för den inneboende och planlagda användningen olika miljöer bär på. Hennes arbeten innehåller ofta en arkitektur eller form som är tydligt förankrad i sin tid och den historia den bär med sig. Samtidigt har hennes verk en mer abstrakt sida där komposition och mönster är det framträdande och där bilden fungerar mer som ett slags pågående mantra.

Åsa Norberg är född 1977 i Göteborg och gick ut från Umeå Konsthögskola 2007. I maj i år visade hon utställningen Same places different times på Galleri Pictura i Lund. Sedan ett år tillbaka driver hon tillsammans med Jennie Sundén projektrummet Hit i Göteborg. www.asanorberg.com

I Fredrik Noréns arbete behandlas frågor kring olika ytors och objekts värden och funktioner. Hur förändras vårt sätt att se på ett objekt när dess sätt att fungera förändras? Vilken funktion tillkommer när den ursprungliga funktionen tas bort?

Arbetet tar sin utgångspunkt i objekt och ytor hämtade från vår närmiljö och handlar bl.a. om hur olika formspråk omkring oss kommunicerar på ett symboliskt plan.

Ofta används äldre tekniker av illusionsmåleri i arbetena, i ett försök att utveckla dessa bortom dess ursprungliga funktioner.

Fredrik Norén är född 1979. Han har under det senaste året ställt ut på bl.a. Galerie Alexandra Saheb i Berlin, Arnstedt & Kullgren i Östra Karup samt Galleri Thomas Wallner i Malmö. www.fredriknoren.com

Jennie Sundéns konstnärskap kan liknas vid redaktionellt arbete. Hon är på många vis en samlare som utifrån funnet material skapar kompilationer och abstraherade kopplingsmönster. Verken blir citat och översättningar utformade som teckningar, kollage, texter och installationer där existentiella frågor ofta utkristalliserar sig. Hennes intresse ligger i språkets möjligheter och begränsningar och associationsförmågan som metod för berättande.

Jennie Sundén är född 1977, verksam i Göteborg och utbildad på konsthögskolan i Umeå. Fram till den 9/11 visas hennes projekt Guidance på Galleri Box i Göteborg. www.jenniesunden.com

Offentliga verk uppförda i Sundbyberg
Fredrik Nyrén, Corner Structure, 2008
Jesper Nyrén
Åsa Norberg och Jennie Sundén, Dedication, 2008

2007

In the lovingly crafted collages by Jakob Kolding, the artist mixes his trademark visual vocabulary of modernist art and architecture, sociology phrases and characters from electronic music, comics and football. All these things seem to have overlapped in Koldings own upbringing in a suburb of Copenhagen and now form the ingredients of an ongoing work in progress. Kolding approaches the question of what happens when we let architecture structure our lives from a multitude of different angles. An idiosyncratic “Koldingesque” cityscape arises out of the mix, where one senses the artist’s own fascination and scepticism with the modernist utopias. In this urban space, art and architecture are often invaded, by people and phenomena that weren’t at all planned to exist there. One such figure is the skater who takes liberties with for example a minimalist sculpture by using it as a skateboard ramp.

In his collages he uncovers underlying ideas and attitudes behind our built environments and makes unexpected connections between popular culture and architecture in an effortless fusion of aesthetics and politics. In spite of his misgivings about settled life in the suburbs as envisioned by city planners, the artist betrays a clear preference for the spare design ideals of 60’s and 70’s architecture. A taste that recurs in the artist’s interest in the formal analogies between the repetitious beats of electronic music, modernist architecture and the paired down aesthetics of minimalist sculpture

The title of the exhibition Pattern Recognition refers to the process by which machines can find patterns in unclassified or randomly arranged information. The expression serves as a loosely held frame both for the works in the show and for the working method of the artist. Pattern Recognition spans 10 years of Jakob Kolding’s work. Audiences will find examples of most aspects of his art practice. There will be drawings from 1996, old and new collages, a documentation of public art projects, an improvised sculpture and examples of the artists sleeve design for the pop group St Etienne. Parts of the exhibition will be presented at OVERGADEN – Institute for Contemporary Art in Copenhagen in the spring of 2007.

About Jakob Kolding
Jakob Kolding was born in Albertslund, Denmark in 1971. He studied sociology at Roskilde University and later went on to study art at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. He currently lives and works in Berlin. Jakob Kolding exhibited in the group show Organising Freedom at the Modern Museum in Stockholm in 2000 and had a IASPIS residency in Stockholm Winter/Autumn 2005-2006. Selected exhibitions from 2006 include a solo-show at Team Gallery in New York, the Busan Biennale, South Korea and a public art project for the dutch public art agency SKOR in Amsterdam.

On February 8th a solo show with the Swedish artist Alexander Gutke opens at Marabouparken Annex. Significant for Alexander Gutke’s artistic practice is a material self-reflexivity, where the works, busy chasing their own tails, manages to create a larger, parallel story. Everyday objects, technology and abstract narratives are transformed into installations for reflection over their own inherent qualities.

The audience is led into the exhibition by the wall drawing Horizon (2001); a work that with simple means creates a “mental horizon” for our experience of time and space. A several metre long number comes to an end with a laconic “dagar” (“days”) through which it creates a comprehensible frame for the unfathomable. Similarly, the slide projection Lighthouse (2006) stretches our established way of perceiving the dimensions of a room by creating a picture plane that seems to extend beyond the surface of the wall. Alexander Gutke often repeats an event or a section of an event and lets it loop in a “time-space” of its own. In The White Light of the Void (2002) we follow, over and over again, an empty film that gets stuck in the projector and melts in the heat of the projector lamp. The melting film is a familiar way of communicating a feeling of nostalgia, loss or the end of an epoch in film. In 9 Ways to Say it’s Over (2006) the artist again shows us how our relationship to reality is shaped through images. A series of “The End” signs from films from the 1920’s and onwards in a number of languages speaks of the universal in the experience of a romance or a loss. The “The End” signage, however obvious it may seem today played a huge role in defining how our experience had come to an end. The film arrives at its final narrative destination while the psychological room created between the viewer, the characters and the story continues to live a life of its own. In Exploded View (2005) this self-reflexivity reaches a crescendo with a slide projector that seems to ponder its own interior and its own projection. This is the tautological artwork par excellence; a projector that shows its own insides in a slideshow, while at the same time managing to transform the images of its own components into a fantastic journey into the microscopic.

Om Alexander Gutke
Alexander Gutke was born in Gothenburg in 1971. He graduated from the Malmö Art Academy in 2001. Since then he’s been based in Malmö and Berlin and has exhibited extensively internationally. Right now he is participating in Die Wörter, die Dinge (Kunstverein, Düsseldorf) and is also a resident artist at Centre des Récollets in Paris. The last years exhibitions include; Dreamlands Burn (Mucsarnok kunsthalle, Budapest, 2006), Objet à Part (La Galerie, Noisy Le Sec, Paris, 2006) and Temporary Import (Art Forum Berlin, 2005).

Fia Backström, born in Stockholm, was educated at University of Stockholm and Konstfack University College of Arts Crafts and Design (Stockholm) and at Columbia University (New York). For over the past ten years Backstöm has lived and worked in New York. Backström has become known for a number of exhibitions and performances, which she has staged in her home, in public spaces and at commercial galleries. In May, she will be presenting her first solo exhibition in Stockholm, at Marabouparken annex.

Fia Backström’s work highlights the parameters of what defines an exhibition; such as an artwork, a collaboration, or an audience. The generative logic of the work unfurls across a stretch of situations, usually of her own design, encompassing activities and their documentation, environments, gatherings, performances, artworks by other artists, her own texts, prints, recordings, readings, and ephemera. Through a development of format and display methodology, Backström engages peers and visitors in her excavations of the shifting faces of ideology, politics, advertisement and propaganda.

Since the mid-nineties, Fia Backström has participated in a large number of international exhibitions. Her work is currently included in the exhibitions Happiness of Objects (Sculpture Center, New York, 2007) and The Price of Everything (Whitney ISP, Hunter Graduate Center, New York, 2007). She is also a participant in the United Nations Plaza recidency project in Berlin.

The exhibition title Mmmore... plays on the satisfaction and the addiction that both sugar and images create in us. In addition to a selection of new and old works, Fia Backström will set up an outdoor happening in Marabou Park on June 3rd. Eco Day corporate-friendly get-together with a touch of the green movement of the seventies, relates ideas on recycling, life-style and “good” ideologies from a marketing perspective.

In Blonde Revolution (a fia backström production, New York, 2004) Backström confronts the self-conscious goodness and fake fairness of the art world, as displayed in so-called “minority-exhibitions.” The work consists of a manifesto and an environment, into which works by exclusively blonde artists has been lifted.

In lesser new york (a fia backström production, New York, 2005) Backström continues her investigation of display and what an artwork can be. She emphasizes the activity space of collaborations, minor publications, posters, sound works, etc, which according to the artist constitutes a crucial part of an art scene. Just as the distinction between the underground and the establishment is blurred, the logic of the display method, which here transforms the material into a hyper-decorative, form-and-colour coordinated wall newspaper, fuses a strategy of communist propaganda with the seduction of commercialism and shopping.

A New Order for a New Economy – to Form and Content (A proposal to re-arrange the ads of Artforum, Andrew Kreps Gallery, White Columns, Whitney Curatorial Studies, New York, 2006–2007) investigates content displacement via formal qualities. Backström rearranges the ad pages of the world’s largest art magazine; Artforum, according to colour, form and theme. The commercial iconography of the art world, originally designed and arranged to give advertisers maximum visual impact through clashing contrast, is streamlined and redirected into categories such as “animals”, “crying and laughing men” and “collectivism.”

In Herd instinct 360° (New York, 2005-2006), the darker sides of human collective behaviour are investigated, in the art world as well as in society at large. During three Sunday afternoons, Backström staged a situation with sacred undertones, including lectures, performances and common meals. In Marabouparken annex, this environment will be partially re-created. On Sunday May 13th Backström will enact her performance Herd Instinct 360° followed by a screening of the talks included in the initial gatherings.

Events:
Eco Day
Herd Instinct 360°

With a motto adapted from BBC founder John Reith’s remit to “Inform, Educate, Entertain”, Marabouparken has the pleasure of opening this autumn’s exhibition of works by the British artist Olivia Plender.

Information, Education, Entertainment is a thematic solo exhibition which focuses on the TV medium and the art world portrayal of art and artists. The work Monitor (2006–2007) is a slide show essay with an accompanying soundtrack based on the screenplay from a TV programme Private View. The original episode was a part of the BBC’s first arts series Monitor, screened in 1960. The photographs in the slideshow are images of contemporary London based around the narrative of the soundtrack. Together, slide show and soundtrack, tell the story of the changing conditions of art and the gentrification of working class areas of London. The piece was originally presented as a performance at the Tate Triennial but is here shown as an installation.

The installation Ken Russell in Conversation with Olivia Plender (2005) includes the video documentation of an interview between Olivia Plender and the controversial filmmaker. The interview took place before an audience in a stage set reminiscent of TV studios from the 1970s. The topics covered include the experimental documentaries and artist’s portraits Ken Russell made for the BBC in the 60s, the Romantic idea of artistic genius, questions of taste and style and the controversies about him as a media celebrity and filmmaker. Russell’s media persona becomes an image of double-ness as he simultaneously tries to represent and live the role of the artistic genius. With the moralising narrative tone of a nineteenth century temperance movement pamphlet, the most recent episode of Olivia Plender’s ongoing comic book project The Masterpiece (2001-) follows the fate and adventures of the young artist Nick. At Marabouparken, the latest edition The Road to Ruin (for Öyvind Fahlström) (2006) will be presented both as a comic book and as an installation with the characters as life-size cut outs. This episode takes place in the 1980s and we follow Nick as he grapples with the sponsorship ideas of the mega-corporation Bucks, demonstrating how the Romantic notion of genius reinvents itself to adapt to a neo-liberal logic.

During the exhibition Information, Education, Entertainment a programme of film screenings and talks has been put together in cooperation with Filmklubben (the Film Club), a mobile platform for political film. The programme will focus on how the artist is portrayed by television and the art world and on public service media as an ideological tool. Dates and times will be available on Marabouparken homepage from October 11th.

About the artist
In her works Olivia Plender investigates clichés about “the artist as outsider”, “the creative genius” and “the bohemian lifestyle” – as anachronisms and in their contemporary updated guises. In a collage of references, from pulp literature and academic history books to documentary and fictional narratives, she delves into historical occurrences, often focussing on the evolution of industrial society.

An interest in didacticism and the narration of history is clear in how Olivia Plender presents her works. Her installations, publications, posters and lectures are rife with references to – and borrowings from – popular material such as satirical comics, as well as authoritative museum tableaux.

Olivia Plender’s latest work is the graphic novel A Stellar Key to the Summerland published by Bookworks. This autumn her work will be shown in Art Now Live at Tate Britain, How to Endure in Athens at the Athens Biennial, Mystic Truths at the Auckland Art Gallery and Le Truc at the Project Arts Centre in Dublin. Olivia Plender currently holds a residency at Iaspis and is co-editor of Untitled Magazine. Since May 2006, Olivia Plender is collaborating with a group of artists and designers around the mobile platform Canal.

2006

Marabouparken Art Space is pleased to announce an exhibition with Swedish artist Johanna Billing, featuring four films shot in four different European cities. In the exhibition More Films About Songs, Cities and Circles, Marabouparken Art Space presents four films from Oslo (Where She is At, 2001), London (Look Out!, 2003), Amsterdam (Magic And Loss, 2005) and Zagreb (Magical World, 2005) and each city adding its own layer of meaning. Included in the exhibition is also the extensive documentation of the musical tour You Don’t Love Me Yet.

A feeling of melancholy and loss permeates Johanna Billing’s films and her representations of changing societies and the feelings that people suppress and loose touch with. The films portray people in staged, concentrated situations. Their emotional charge is derived from the tensions we keep within and from shifts of focus between the individuals portrayed and the societal backdrop against which their actions take place. The participants in Johanna Billing’s films all play themselves but also take part in a multilayered interpretation of a place and a situation that oscillates between documentary and fiction. Johanna Billing’s films alternate, in a unique way, between charged silence and a narrative borne by pop songs. There are many things that we are unable to speak about without ending up in commonplaces and clichés. The protagonists of Johanna Billing’s films remain silent – unless they sing.

Where She Is At was filmed at the Ingierstrand baths outside Oslo in 2001. In the film a woman’s quiet struggle with herself on the diving tower is brought together with the fate of a recreational facility threatened with closure. Will she dare to jump? Will the baths be closed? Will today’s Norway take the step and leave the old ideas of fresh air and recreation for all behind? The film is looped and we are forced to follow her painful hesitance over and over again.

Look Out, which was filmed in Shoreditch in East London in 2003, records the contrast between a run-down and poor neighbourhood and the housing development then taking place at old Gainsborough Film Studios. The camera follows a group of youths from the area on a tour of one of the luxury flats for prospective buyers. A strange atmosphere develops as they examine and test the sober furnishings and gaze out over their run-down and crime-riddled neighbourhood in this cross between a field trip and house-show.

In Magic and Loss, recorded in Amsterdam 2005, a group of people silently pack up what seems to be a pleasantly furnished single household. A slow methodical choreography develops in their filling cartons and hoisting down furniture into the street. In these strangers’ mechanical handling of someone’s personal belongings, a number of questions and associations about the absent occupier of the flat present themselves.

Magical World, recorded in Zagreb in 2005, shows a children’s orchestra rehearsing Rotary Connection’s Magical World from 1968. The camera moves between the music room and the worn surroundings of the culture centre outside Zagreb, in a Croatia whose hurry to adapt to the rest of “normal” European threatens its own culture. In forced and newly learned English, a young Croatian boy sings the enigmatic and defiant first lines; “Why do you want to wake me from such a beautiful dream?…Can’t you see that I am sleeping?… We live in a Magical World…”.

You Don’t Love Me Yet was both a film recorded in Stockholm in 2003 and a tour that was organised by Johanna Billing and Index (The Swedish Foundation for Contemporary Art) in Stockholm 2002–2005. Twenty artists were invited to perform a cover of Roky Erickson’s You Don’t Love Me Yet from 1984 during an evening at Index. Performing a cover means paying a tribute to another artists by creating your own interpretation of a song – a test of the artists ability to maintain his or her identity while performing somebody’s else song. The concert was repeated in 15 different cities with a resulting 150 versions of the song that will be available at Marabouparken annex for screening. The film You Don’t Love Me Yet depicts a group of artists performing the song together in a recording studio in Stockholm.

About Johanna Billing
Since graduating from the University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, in Stockholm in 1999, Johanna Billing has been one of Sweden’s most prolific and renowned artists. Besides the Make it Happen record label, which she runs with her brother Anders Billing since 1998, Johanna Billing has been the initiator of a number of music-clubs and tours and participated in numerous exhibitions including: Le Mois de la Photo Montréal 2001, Motstånd Moderna Muséet 2001, the Italian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2003, and the Moscow and Istanbul Biennials in 2005.

GÅVÄNTASTANNA

Marabouparken Annex has the great pleasure of announcing the exhibition GÅVÄNTASTANNA, a total installation by Karl Holmqvist.
Renowned both internationally and in Sweden, this exhibition high-lights Karl Holmqvist’s artistic practice in performance- and text based art since a fifteen year period. The term total installation was first coined by Danish architect and interior designer Verner Panton in the early seventies, from a desire to provide inspiration for people to make use of his textiles and furniture designs to create entire environments in their homes. Based on this idea, Karl Holmqvist has created his own total installation letting the black and white Panton ‘Geometry’ pattern provide background for a selection of texts from, amongst others, Gertrude Stein, Patti Smith, Kakuzo Okakura (The Book of Tea) and William Blake put together according to the cut-up method first invented by beat writer William Burroughs. The text excerpts that are taken from Karl Holmqvist’s most recent book I ON A LION IN ZION are also to be found in a reading on DVD rolling across a TV-screen in synch with the drawn-out pace of Holmqvist’s voice.

In Study Center 1991–2006, a specially commissioned new installation work, Karl Holmqvist has gathered a selection of his artist’s books, writings and graphic design posters published over the past 15 years, several of which have never previously been shown in Sweden. Finally, also included is a wide selection of films, such as the anti-pollution epic CARS KILL or the just recently finished Black Mountain College made in collaboration with French artist Loris Gréaud. This will be the first in-depth survey of Holmqvist’s deliberately eclectic artistic output and his first one-person exhibition in Stockholm since 8 years.

In Study Center 1991–2006, a specially commissioned new installation work, Karl Holmqvist has gathered a selection of his artist’s books, writings and graphic design posters published over the past 15 years, several of which have never previously been shown in Sweden. Finally, also included is a wide selection of films, such as the anti-pollution epic CARS KILL or the just recently finished Black Mountain College made in collaboration with French artist Loris Gréaud. This will be the first in-depth survey of Holmqvist’s deliberately eclectic artistic output and his first one-person exhibition in Stockholm since 8 years.

About Karl Holmqvist
Graduating from the Stockholm University in 1987 with a B A in Literature and Linguistics, Karl Holmqvist first turned to video as a way of combining his interests in language experimentation, text and live performance. The act of reading has been central to Karl Holmqvist’s artistic practice, both as a ‘live’ element creating atmosphere and situations of exchange in the moment and as the basis of extensively undertaken research projects involving various forms of human communication, language in all its aspects and the state of things in the world today.

His most recent one-person exhibitions include; Wie Delphine, Delphine es tun…at Galerie Meerrettich in Berlin (2006), MAYDAY at the C M U Art Museum, Chiang Mai, Thailand (2002) and Karl Holmqvist at Bildmuseet in Umeå (1999). Holmqvists artist’s practice includes numerous collaborations: Black Mountain College with Loris Gréaud currently on view at Notre Histoire, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (on-going), I Will Survive with Elke Krystufek, Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Ghent 2005, with Uglycute and Rirkrit Tiravanija at The Land in Thailand (on-going) and at Utopia Station, Venice Biennale (2003) and Haus der Kunst, Munich (2004). In 2000, Karl Holmqvist collaborated with Jeremy Deller on Now It Is Allowable, and became one of the few non-British artists ever to have entered The British Art Show, B A S 5 (2000). Artist’s books include; 21 POEMS (1997), The K. Protocol (2003), Den Bästa Dikten i Skärholmen (2004), I’M WITH YOU IN ROCKLAND (2004) and I ON A LION IN ZION (2005).

A conversation will be held on May 11 at 6.30 PM between Karl Holmqvist and art critic Mats B, that will provide further guidance and links to contemporary art practice.

Marabouparken proudly presents an exhibition with the Finnish artist Liisa Lounila (1976) who lives and works in Helsinki. Liisa Lounila works with film, photo and painting but regardless of the technique her works often situate themselves between the moving and still photographic image. The exhibition is a part of XPOSEPTEMBER – Stockholm photo festival.

Lounila gained international acclaim for the films Popcorn, Flirt and Play a series of lo-fi “film sculptures” with muffled soundscapes. These were made with a home-made 360° pin-hole camera that was created with the purpose of allowing Lounila to recreate three dimensional scenes. The films are made with the so-called time slice techique which gives the viewer the impression of movement round a series of frozen events. Bodies and objects seem to float freely in space. The scenes seem to get reconstructed and deconstructed simultaneously. Instead of a conventional, linear narrative, Lounila shows us gestures, memory flashes and details of vanished moments. These are the small parts of a bigger story that the artists let us glimpse but not fully comprehend. In her exhibition at Marabouparken Art Space the artist will be showing the films Flirt (2002), Play (2003), a series of light boxes entitled Roma (2003) and the text works Road Movie (1998) and Valour (2006).

Liisa Lounika, Play>>, 2003
Liisa Lounika, Play>>, 2003

In Play the viewer is given a three dimensional rendition of every gesture and glance of the audience of small and crowded basement club in Berlin. Dark Finnish pop contributes to the club atmosphere – both energetic and expectant. In Flirt a muffled, screechy soundtrack gives the film a threatening undercurrent in contrast to the slightly flirty and ballet like fight that is acted out by a group of people. In the series of light boxes, entitled Roma, black and white, three dimensional lenticular prints portrays interacting couples in intimate home settings. A voyeuristic feeling charcterizes this photoseries of images that becomes animated as the viewers move by. Road Movie is “text film” consisting of texts found on the internet that have been pieced together so that the original meaning becomes short-circuited.

In the lovingly crafted collages by Jakob Kolding, the artist mixes his trademark visual vocabulary of modernist art and architecture, sociology phrases and characters from electronic music, comics and football. All these things seem to have overlapped in Koldings own upbringing in a suburb of Copenhagen and now form the ingredients of an ongoing work in progress. Kolding approaches the question of what happens when we let architecture structure our lives from a multitude of different angles. An idiosyncratic “Koldingesque” cityscape arises out of the mix, where one senses the artist’s own fascination and scepticism with the modernist utopias. In this urban space, art and architecture are often invaded, by people and phenomena that weren’t at all planned to exist there. One such figure is the skater who takes liberties with for example a minimalist sculpture by using it as a skateboard ramp.

In his collages he uncovers underlying ideas and attitudes behind our built environments and makes unexpected connections between popular culture and architecture in an effortless fusion of aesthetics and politics. In spite of his misgivings about settled life in the suburbs as envisioned by city planners, the artist betrays a clear preference for the spare design ideals of 60’s and 70’s architecture. A taste that recurs in the artist’s interest in the formal analogies between the repetitious beats of electronic music, modernist architecture and the paired down aesthetics of minimalist sculpture

The title of the exhibition Pattern Recognition refers to the process by which machines can find patterns in unclassified or randomly arranged information. The expression serves as a loosely held frame both for the works in the show and for the working method of the artist. Pattern Recognition spans 10 years of Jakob Kolding’s work. Audiences will find examples of most aspects of his art practice. There will be drawings from 1996, old and new collages, a documentation of public art projects, an improvised sculpture and examples of the artists sleeve design for the pop group St Etienne. Parts of the exhibition will be presented at OVERGADEN – Institute for Contemporary Art in Copenhagen in the spring of 2007.

About Jakob Kolding
Jakob Kolding was born in Albertslund, Denmark in 1971. He studied sociology at Roskilde University and later went on to study art at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. He currently lives and works in Berlin. Jakob Kolding exhibited in the group show Organising Freedom at the Modern Museum in Stockholm in 2000 and had a IASPIS residency in Stockholm Winter/Autumn 2005-2006. Selected exhibitions from 2006 include a solo-show at Team Gallery in New York, the Busan Biennale, South Korea and a public art project for the dutch public art agency SKOR in Amsterdam.

2005

Katarina Löfström presents three new videos that were first shown in Berlin last summer. Like her previous work, these works move between reality and abstraction. All three are animations based on filmed material. This method is the artist’s way of concentrating the motif to come closer to what she perceives to be the essence of the picture.

Löfström avoids language, understanding and meaning to leave us room for associations and dreams. The films have no beginning or end and the only clues we are given are their titles. These are not to be seen as keys to interpreting the works but rather as the first link in a possible chain of associations- like a piece of music with a title but no lyrics.

An Island (DVD loop, 4,30 min,2004). A glittering Shangri-La appears like a vision in the night. The film footage behind this mirage is of a Stockholm amusement park, surrounded by boats with lanterns lit, filmed on a summer night in 2002. The soundtrack is a collage of sounds created by Katarina Löfström in collaboration with sound artist Sean Reynard. Tower (DVD loop, 9 min, 2004). The film is an animation of Berlin by night filmed during a thunderstorm the summer of 2004. The city is seen from the rotating restaurant at the top of Berlin’s tv-tower. During the rotation, Berlin’s principal boulevards; Kastanjen Allée, Schönhauser Allée, Karl Marx Allée, can be seen, like glittering snakes winding through the night. The music, by Bernhard Günther creates a muted soundscape, underscoring the slow majestic rotation of the tower. Score (DVD loop, 4,30 min,2004). This one of few works by Löfström that is without sound but gives the more reason for the term “visual music”. An animated score of black dots pours down the white picture-surface, changing size and creating rhythms in a pumping musical flow. If Löfström’s technique in An Island and Tower can be described as taking a step back from the motif, Score represents a leap into it. The animation is based on a photograph of the far reaches of the universe, taken through NASA’s Hubble telescope. Katarina Löfström has zoomed into this picture, which represents the limits of human knowledge, extremely closely and used the Benday dots that compose it for her animation.

Text: Helena Selder

Katarina Löfström was born in 1970 and graduated from Konstfack in Stockholm in 1997. Her work has frequently been shown internationally. She has spent the last two years working and living in Berlin. Katarina Löfström’s work appears courtesy of Jan Winkelmann / Berlin.

Goodbye

With artist Peter Thörneby’s exhibition, Goodbye, Maraboupark continues its artprogram with the ambition to present exhibitions of younger artists’ work. The exhibition features works by Peter Thörneby from 2000 to his latest work, the first issue of the magazine  Goodbye.

A recurring element in Peter Thörneby’s work is a search for new places, mental and physical, where the possibility of having unexpected thoughts is enhanced. Thörneby uses prints and patterns to create backdrops against which artist and audience can dream themselves away. One such backdrop which appears in several works is a raindrop-pattern inspired by the symbolist painter Ivan Aguéli’s opium-clouded sensation of seeing a text turn to raindrops before his eyes. In Thörneby’s visual interpretation this becomes a silver rain, a metaphor for a deeper understanding of art. The silver rain then forms a backdrop against which he places texts about art’s function of finding and presenting new places and ideas.

Peter Thörneby, Goodybye #1, 2004
Peter Thörneby, Goodybye #1, 2004

In history, new patterns have often been ideological accompaniments and descriptions of a new political order. Patterns play a central role in Thörneby’s art from artist duo Gratis Design’s use of textile patterns as backgrounds for Walter Gropius’ manifesto, the poster series Gratis Design’s Bauhaus Manifesto and 10-gruppen Patterns (collaboration with Fredrik Holmqvist 2000) via the silver rain-pattern mentioned above to patterns for unknown rooms in the poster series How Can I Sleep With Your Voice in My Head (Vita Kuben, Norrlandsoperan, 2003).

Peter Thörneby, Lensflares, 2001
Peter Thörneby och Fredrik Holmqvist, Gratis Designs Bauhausmanifesto and 10-gruppen patterns, 2000

In Thörneby’s latest work; the magazine Goodbye (2004) the artist leaves abstraction to examine day-dreaming from an everyday perspective. A small family is portrayed while doing the laundry, a situation easy enough to identify with and dream oneself away from. The magazine has the format of an LP-cover and folds out to reveal lyrics and photographs of the little family. The word Goodbye appears in a smoke-like typography, like a whisper from the dreamers’s lips before he or she disappears into another world.

Marabouparken would like to thank: Veidekke, Sundbybergs Stad, ABF Norra Stor-Stockholm, Sundbybergs stad kultur & bibliotek and Fastighets AB Förvaltaren.

Sculpturepark – cloud 7

In September we inaugurate a solo show with the Swedish artist Bella Rune who has become known for sculptural works with a performative dimension. The perfomativ aspect of her works can be traced back to a  longstanding interest in the objects of everyday life as carriers of different aspects of society; social codes, politics, aesthetics, economy, psychology and sexuality. In the new works she continues her playful investigations into our everyday-fetishisms and the anthropomorphic whishes we project upon the objects around us. In the upcoming exhibition at Marabouparken annex she creates her own sociopolitical and spatial world consisting of a mix of new and old works.

Swiss artist Luca Frei shows wallpaintings, prints and sculptures at Marabouparken Annex.